Masuria

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Masuria

(məzo͝o`rēə), Ger. Masurenland, Pol. Mazury, region, N Poland. It is a low-lying area covered by large lakes and forests and drained by many small rivers. The original population of the region was expelled by the Teutonic Knights and replaced (14th cent.) with Polish settlers. Masuria later became part of East Prussia and was largely Germanized by the early 20th cent. After Masuria passed to Poland in 1945, most of the German-speaking population was expelled and replaced by Poles. The Masurian Lakes region, where more than 2,700 lakes are located, was the scene of heavy fighting early in World War I. Two Russian armies, commanded by generals Samsonov and Rennenkampf, were defeated in the region—Samsonov by Hindenburg at Tannenburg (Aug., 1914) and Rennenkampf by Mackensen in the lake country (Sept., 1914). The Russians were also repulsed (Feb., 1915) in Masuria in the so-called Winter Battle.

Masuria

a region of NE Poland: until 1945 part of East Prussia: includes the Masurian Lakes, scene of Russian defeats by the Germans (1914, 1915) during World War I
References in periodicals archive ?
The plotting of the clustering analysis of the brooches examined in the present study shows that fibulae found in the Lower Danube region have multiple finks to brooches from distant areas, including Mazuria and Asia Minor (see Fig.
600, in Crimea, (112) Hungary (113) and Mazuria. (114) The three burials with "Slavic" bow fibulae may thus be viewed as the southernmost known examples of the early-seventh-century female burial fashion.
Later contacts with Mazuria and Eastern Prussia are also documented for sites in eastern and southern Romania, Moldova, and Ukraine, which produced "Slavic" bow fibulae (Curta 2001, pp.
Mazuria further produced evidence of local production of bow fibulae (Dabrowski 1980).
Berlin asked General Superintendent Carl Moll to launch an investigation into the political activities of "his" pastors, but a concerned von Muhler also looked for information about Mazuria from sources other than the Provincial Consistory.
(31) Although counterrevolutionary Protestants founded the society to battle secularism and socialism in urban centers, Berlin believed it could lend a hand in rural Mazuria because Catholicism was undermining the conservative tie between the Protestant Church and monarch in much the same way that contemporary nonreligious agendas were attempting to reformat traditional society.
Catholic practices, heathen customs, and superstition continued to play a major role in nineteenth-century Mazuria. They were proof of the church's failure for Oldenberg who, like Carl Moll, concluded that the Mazurians were not typical nineteenth-century Prussian Protestants.
According to contemporary accounts, however, the Lutheran clergy confronted an almost impossible task because they were not working with a Catholic population but with a "heathen people only touched by the outward forms of Catholicism." (37) After carefully documenting the church's struggle to maintain a bilingual ministry in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, Oldenberg turned to the Mazuria that he observed in 1865.
While other regions of the Prussian kingdom improved their transportation networks, urbanized, and industrialized, Mazuria remained an isolated agrarian region.
Oldenberg believed that the Inner Mission Society could and needed to duplicate this experience throughout Mazuria because Bible study insulated the people from the message of the priests.
For Oldenberg and the German clergy, unacceptable practices in 1865 were the residual Catholic and non-Christian observances that still commanded enormous respect in Protestant Mazuria. These included prayers to saints, repetitious intercessory prayers, the use of charms, participation in pilgrimages, and attendance at Mass, which Oldenberg documented thoroughly in the section entitled "Superstitions and Catholicism." (55) The fourteen pages devoted to what he believed was non-Protestant behavior were intended to convince Berlin of the church's failure and the need for intervention if it wished to prevent the Catholic Church from gaining the upper hand in the region.
The Reformation in Mazuria may have contended with the Christianization of a pagan people, but it was painfully obvious that after three hundred years of preaching and religious instruction, the Protestant perspective had made little impact on the Polish-speaking Mazurians.