McDonald Observatory


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McDonald Observatory,

astronomical observatory located on Mt. Locke, near Fort Davis, Tex.; founded in 1932, sponsored by the Univ. of Texas in cooperation with the Univ. of Chicago. Its equipment includes 107-in. (272-cm), 82-in. (208-cm), 32-in. (81-cm), and 30-in. (76-cm) reflecting telescopes. The 107-in. reflector, which began operation in 1968 as the third largest telescope in the world, was built under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. It was primarily used for the study of bodies within the solar system, particularly the planets, satellites, and asteroids, to gather information for possible use in future space exploration. Principal programs include research on interstellar molecules as well as the spectroscopic and photometric analysis of stellar, interstellar, and extragalactic matter. The observatory produces the "Star Date" radio program, providing a daily report of astronomical news and sky events across North America.

McDonald Observatory

(măk-don -ăld) An observatory of the University of Texas on Mount Locke, Texas, at an altitude of 2081 meters. It has a 2.7-meter and a 2.1-meter reflecting telescope, acquired in 1969 and 1939 respectively. When commissioned, the 2.1-meter Otto Struve Telescope was the second largest in the world; it has been modernized and equipped for infrared work. In 1996, the Hobby–Eberly Telescope was installed.
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McArthur reported these findings in a press conference at the 216th meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Miami, along with her collaborator Fritz Benedict, also of McDonald Observatory, and team member Rory Barnes of the University of Washington.
The picture of the zodiacal light by Alexander Yuferev on page 108 of the September issue reminded me of a similar photo I took one evening in February 1963 at the McDonald Observatory site in West Texas while awaiting use of the 36-inch reflector telescope.
In reply Harlan Smith, director of the University of Texas McDonald Observatory and professor at the Austin campus, points out that astronomers started talking about the Space Telescope back in 1962.
Washington, July 10 (ANI): A scientist is using a new instrument at the University of Texas at Austin's McDonald Observatory to dissect nearby galaxies to learn how stars form, and in the process, generating a flood of new information that will benefit other scientists' work.
To make sure the transiting object was not a low-mass star or brown dwarf (which are about the same size as a gas-giant planet), McCullough's team conducted follow-up spectral observations with telescopes at the University of Texas's McDonald Observatory. The results proved that the star wobbles back and forth slightly as it's being tugged by a companion with 90% [+ or -] 7% of Jupiter's mass.
They used the 2.7-meter telescope, the largest belonging to the McDonald Observatory at Ft.
The team used the Hobby-Eberly Telescope of McDonald Observatory in south-western Texas to make its discovery.
Masterman's NYAA prize consists of a plaque; an all-expense-paid trip to the League's 64th national convention in Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas, this August; a 10-inch LX200R telescope donated by Meade Instruments Corporation; a lifetime observing pass to McDonald Observatory, courtesy the University of Texas; and complimentary membership in the International Dark-Sky Association.
17, however, Richard Binzel at the University of Texas McDonald Observatory caught it clearly.
A group of 10 amateur astronomers led by Louis Berman met on October 8, 2005, at McDonald Observatory in Fort Davis, Texas, for a night of observing at the eyepiece of the 2.1-meter (82-inch) Otto Struve telescope.
The University of Texas, which plans a telescope of similar size for its McDonald Observatory in Ft.
Modeled after the Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory in western Texas, SALT's 10-by-11-meter primary mirror consists of 91 hexagonal segments and has an effective aperture of 10 meters.