McDonough, William Andrews

McDonough, William Andrews

(1951–)
American architect, founding principal of William McDonough + Partners in 1981, cofounder of McDonough Braungart Design Chemistry (MBDC) with German chemist Michael Braungart. McDonough’s first major commission was the 1984 Environmental Defense Fund Headquarters, whose requirement for good indoor air quality in the structure exposed him to the need for sustainable development. In 1996 McDonough became the first and only individual recipient of the Presidential Award for Sustainable Development. In 2002 he wrote (with Michael Braungart) Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things. The Ford Motor Company’s legendary River Rouge Plant in Dearborn, MI (2002), includes the world’s largest “living roof,” covered with more than 10 acres of sedum, a low-growing ground cover. The Bernheim Arboretum Visitor Center in Clermont, KY (2005), blurs the line between outdoor and indoor space, draws heavily on the biophilia hypothesis—the study of the human desire and physiological need for contact with nature. The NASA Ames Research Center’s Sustainability Base—designed to be a net energy positive building—produces more energy than it consumes. The firm’s duplex design for the “Make It Right Foundation” will offer residents natural ventilation, roof-mounted PV (photovoltaic) panels, water cisterns to harvest rainwater runoff and rain gardens to absorb storm runoff.
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