Simla Convention

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Simla Convention

 

an agreement concluded between McMahon, representing Great Britain, and Lonchen Shatra, representing local Tibetan authorities, on July 3, 1914, in the city of Simla, India. A British draft of the convention was discussed at an Anglo-Chinese-Tibetan conference in Simla in 1913 and 1914. In March 1914, during the conference, McMahon and Shatra exchanged secret letters and maps concerning a line demarcating the eastern part of the frontier between Tibet and British India. The line, which came to be known as the McMahon Line, was later entered on the maps appended to the British draft convention.

The Simla Convention obligated the Chinese government not to annex Tibet and not to send Chinese troops or civilians into Tibet. The Chinese representative, under pressure from the British, at first initialed the British draft convention but later never signed it. The Chinese government refused to recognize the Simla Convention.

References in periodicals archive ?
"The McMahon line (which demarcates India-China border) is at a distance of approximately 100 km from Chaglagam, now if China makes a bridge at a distance of 25 km from Chaglagam, that implies China is already 60-70 km into our territory," he told ANI here.
Colonial rulers drew some lines on maps such as the Durand Line with Afghanistan, and the McMahon Line with Tibet, which China took over in 1950.
In January 1959, the Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai wrote to Prime Minister Nehru, that no Chinese government has accepted the 'McMahon Line'.
China refuses to acknowledge the McMahon Line that demarcates Arunachal Pradesh to be a part of India.
The Chinese political aim was to employ military force to re-establish her territorial integrity which had been compromised after the intrusion of Indian army and establishment of 43 border posts across the McMahon Line in North West Aksai Chin region and across Subansiri River in North East Frontier Region (NEFA), India.
The pre-1962 exchanges saw India insist on the McMahon Line as marking the boundary in the east.
The McMahon Line boundary dispute is at the heart of relations between China and India.
"The most contentious part of the Sino-Indian border is in the east, the McMahon Line, that traverses five Indian states."" -Ravi Menon Share on facebook Tweet this
In the very same March 22, 1959 letter, Nehru also reminded China of an 1842 treaty on Ladakh and the drawing of the McMahon line in Simla in 1914, which aren't recognised by China.
Yes, it officially belongs to India, but only because of the McMahon line, a boundary drawn by British imperialists in 1911, which China no longer accepts (though China did settle its boundary with Myanmar along the same line).
The latest Sino-India border agreement aimed at mitigating security hazards on the McMahon Line that registered unprecedented understanding and improvement of their bilateral ties bears testimony to the developments that even China, the strategic ally of Pakistan, is no more a bulwark to her expanding economic goals.