Mealworm

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Mealworm

 

the larva of the beetle Tenebrio molitor of the family Tenebrionidae. It damages flour, grain, bran, bread, rusks, pasta, and other products. It sometimes spoils entomological collections. The cosmopolitan, nocturnal beetle appears in late spring. It reproduces in the cellars of warehouses, in mills, and in pasta and confectionery factories. Usually one generation develops per year. The larval phase lasts between 280 and 600 days

References in periodicals archive ?
Despite their name, mealworms are not worms but the larval form of the mealworm beetle that are packed with nutrients which has typically made them a pet food for reptiles, fish and birds as well as being used for fishing bait.
Dried mealworm larvae contain high amounts of crude protein (CP, 46% to 52%) and fat (25% to 35%) which contain abundant essential fatty acids with superior oxidative stability [11].
As Tenetrio founder Sabrina Jaap told German food product magazine, Lebensmittel: "Producing 1 kilogram of protein from mealworms needs just 20 percent of the water, 6 percent of the land area, and less than 5 percent of the feed compared to producing 1 kilogram of beef protein."
An unaware visitor randomly stopping by may be shocked, however, by the menu that includes cricket tea, mealworm muffin and a silkworm green tea smoothie.
mellonella may not always be available, therefore, yellow mealworm (Tenebrio molitor) could be an alternative host.
Whichever goal the animals dribble their mealworm treats into will win the game.
Upon arrival my friend (who I had convinced to accompany me) and I were greeted with the following cocktails: Mealworm virgin mojito, anty gin and tonic and chapuline garden Pimms.
A HORRIFIED mum has told how she spotted half a mealworm in a spoonful of her son's baby food.
A team of international scientists have found that mealworms can safely consume and convert Styrofoam plastics into bio-fragments - thanks to a unique species of bacteria in their guts.
The researchers show that mealworms could survive and thrive on Styrofoam--turning it into biodegradable worm waste, which can then be used in soil.
She believes mealworms could become an environmentally-sustainable source of protein for humans in the future.