meaning

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meaning

Philosophy
a. the sense of an expression; its connotation
b. the reference of an expression; its denotation. In recent philosophical writings meaning can be used in both the above senses

Meaning

 

the content linked with some expression (word, proposition, sign) of a certain language.

The meaning of linguistic expressions is studied in linguistics, logic, and semiotics. In the science of language, meaning is understood as the sense content of a word. In logic and semiotics the meaning (in Anglo-American philosophy, the reference) of a linguistic expression is understood as that object or class of objects that are designated (named) by the expression (the referential, or extensional, meaning), while the.sense (in Anglo-American philosophy, the meaning) of the expression (sense, or intentional, meaning) implies its thought content—that is, that information contained in the expression by means of which the ascription of the expression to some object (objects) occurs. For example, the referential meanings of the expressions “evening star” and “morning star” refer to one and the same object—the planet Venus—but their thought contents, or sense meanings, are different. Questions of the criteria for equivalence of meanings (senses)—that is, the criteria of synonomy of linguistic expressions—is one of the problems studied by logical semantics.

References in classic literature ?
I suppose that in all languages the similarities of look and sound between words which have no similarity in meaning are a fruitful source of perplexity to the foreigner.
This is its simple and EXACT meaning--that is to say, its restricted, its fettered meaning; but there are ways by which you can set it free, so that it can soar away, as on the wings of the morning, and never be at rest.
The various words used in building them are in the dictionary, but in a very scattered condition; so you can hunt the materials out, one by one, and get at the meaning at last, but it is a tedious and harassing business.
It was only the SOUND that helped him, not the meaning; [3] and so, at last, when he learned that the emphasis was not on the first syllable, his only stay and support was gone, and he faded away and died.
are words which have plenty of meaning, but the SOUNDS
Spoken and written words are, of course, not the only way of conveying meaning. A large part of one of Wundt's two vast volumes on language in his "Volkerpsychologie" is concerned with gesture-language.
When we ask what constitutes meaning, we are not asking what is the meaning of this or that particular word.
The meaning of one of these words differs very fundamentally from the meaning of one of any of our previous classes, being more abstract and logically simpler than any of them.
To say that a word has a meaning is not to say that those who use the word correctly have ever thought out what the meaning is: the use of the word comes first, and the meaning is to be distilled out of it by observation and analysis.
What I have wished to evince is, that the charge brought against the proposed Constitution, of violating the sacred maxim of free government, is warranted neither by the real meaning annexed to that maxim by its author, nor by the sense in which it has hitherto been understood in America.
"Yes, yes, yes," signed the paralytic, casting on Valentine a look of joyful gratitude for having guessed his meaning.
"Excuse me, sir," replied the notary; "on the contrary, the meaning of M.