social solidarity

(redirected from Mechanical solidarity)

social solidarity

the integration, and degree or type of integration, manifested by a society or group. The basis of social solidarity differs between simple societies and more complex societies. Thus in simple societies it is often based on relations of KINSHIP, and direct mutual relations and shared values. In relations between non-kin, and in more complex societies, social solidarity has various bases, e.g. see MECHANICAL AND ORGANIC SOLIDARITY. Whether in more complex societies social solidarity requires 'shared values’, integrative RITUAL, etc., is debated (see CONSENSUS, DOMINANT IDEOLOGY THESIS, RELIGION, CIVIL RELIGION).
References in periodicals archive ?
In mechanical solidarity societies, these beliefs and feelings were part of most individual consciousness.
Durkheim coined two types of solidarity, namely the mechanical solidarity, belonging to primitive societies, and the organic solidarity, characterizing the more developed societies emerged after the division of labour (Durkheim, 1967).
The difference between the two is that in situations of mechanical solidarity, social cohesionand integration comes from the homogeneity of individuals.
Theorising the social division of labour, Durkheim classifies societies into mechanical solidarity and organic solidarity.
Division of labour has impacted upon the strong social uniformity that characterised Dailue as mechanical solidarity.
Every system of any living organism on this planet survives by functioning through mechanical solidarity, a non-cognitive group cohesion.
Baehr points to the media's recursive role in amplifying the cohesion, though he does not engage with neo-Durkheimian work (such as that of Dayan and Katz) on "media events"--live, widely viewed broadcasts of "historic" occasions--as high-tech generators of mechanical solidarity.
Durkheim (1933) discussed these changes in terms of a switch from mechanical solidarity to organic solidarity and Toennies (1988) in terms of a switch from gemeinschaft to gesellschaft (commonly translated as community and society).
110) or that mechanical solidarity refers to "a collective consciousness that people experience as a result of performing the same or similar tasks" (Henslin, 1993, p.
One of Durkheim's most famous insights - that crime in society serves the social function of reinforcing social solidarity - derives from his understanding of mechanical solidarity and repressive law.
What is generated under conditions of organic solidarity is a replacement for that form of conscience collective that underpins the mechanical solidarity that prevails in societies in which 'What makes such a society a "society" at all is the fact that its members adhere to common beliefs and sentiments' (Giddens 1971: 111-112).
Employing a piquant critique of Levi-Strauss as her vehicle, she argues that since the experience of time is so integral to all of human existence, the common dichotimization of our times (historical, linear, irreversible, changing, quantitative, clock-based, "hot" society, organic solidarity, diachronic study) versus other times (traditional, cyclical, reversible, stable, qualitative, task/event-based, "cold" society, mechanical solidarity, synchronic study) is clearly untenable and inappropriate in reflexive social theory.

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