mechanical

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mechanical

1. made, performed, or operated by or as if by a machine or machinery
2. concerned with machines or machinery
3. relating to or controlled or operated by physical forces
4. of or concerned with mechanics
5. Philosophy accounting for phenomena by physically determining forces
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

mechanical

[mi′kan·ə·kəl]
(engineering)
Of, pertaining to, or concerned with machinery or tools.
(graphic arts)
A finished copy that usually contains hand lettering, type proofs, and art especially positioned and mounted so that a photochemical reproduction can be made on a letterpress, offset, or other printing plate. Also known as keyline layout; paste-up.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The approach involved holding the mechanicals in the best configuration currently known, increasing the sheet HST sizing, and an alkenyl succinic anhydride (ASA) increase with a first pass retention increase.
The mechanical aspects of refining, cleaning and screening, and forming affect the same properties through retention, sheet strength, formation, sheet density, sheet porosity, contaminant rejects, etc.
Before turning to making this marriage permanent, consider a few actual mill experiences that illustrate how these chemical and mechanical components can work for or against each other:
Combining mechanical and chemical approaches gave a marriage that resolved all the sheet imperfections.
The filler increase, refining changes, ratio changes, and moisture content changes all required a chemical and a mechanical approach.
These are some examples of how mechanical and chemical approaches to making quality paper can work toward a common good or can oppose each other to the detriment of quality and runnability.
Mechanicals were best for low-value, high-volume products in plants with lots of money and lots of room.
But when it comes to operating costs, the balance shifts dramatically in mechanicals' favor.
For some processors, the choice between cryogenic and mechanical freezing isn't crystal clear.
For a long time, makers of cryogenic and mechanical freezers had their respective turfs staked out as clearly as polar bears in adjoining cages.
Now, makers of frozen food have to weigh all kinds of factors - economics, quality, logistics and more - before deciding on cryogenic freezing, mechanical freezing or a combination of the two.

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