Mediatization


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Mediatization

 

the subordination of imperial princes and other imperial officers of the Holy Roman Empire to more powerful imperial princes. The mediatized princes were subject to the emperor’s power not directly (immediatus) but through other, greater princes; moreover, mediatized territory was included in the holdings of the latter.

Mediatization was widely applied by Napoleon I from 1803 to 1806. Through the mediatized lands, he extended the territories of his allies, Bavaria, Baden, Wiirttemberg, and the other German states, that in 1806 had joined the Confederation of the Rhine. This mediatization facilitated the liquidation of the Holy Roman Empire in 1806.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
These processes of mediatization, or how media uses, transforms, and structures concepts--in this case religion--according to its needs and interests, (7) are also central to our understanding of masculinity and Islam in film.
2012: 407) In this discussion, a central argument for the rising impact of communication and public campaigning efforts as a factor of political interest is the mediatization of the political process as such (e.g.
This can create a fascinating theatrical effect, an infinite matryoshka of mediatizations. For example, when a live or prerecorded video feed is projected onto a satellite dish in Illumination, a sensory feedback loop is created wherein it appears as though the technology that transmits the message is simultaneously made to function as the receiving medium (a screen) onto which the message is projected.
We suggest that this might be a generational effect where, because of the mediatization of politics, younger MPs attribute more importance to mediated discussion among elite-level political actors (cf.
Hjarvard has contributed a fruitful theory that in crucial ways distinguishes between 'mediation' and 'mediatization'.
Chapter 2 presents a "via negativa," explaining what media culture is not; Chapter 3, a look at an initial definition of mediatization; Chapter 4, a more in-depth examination of media culture in the light of mediatization; Chapter 5, "how we live in different forms of translocal communities" (p.
SCHULZ, Winfried 2004: "Reconstructing Mediatization as an Analytical Concept", en European Journal of Communication, no 19 (1), pp.
The pervasive penetration of social life by digital forms of commensuration--search engines, algorithms, and the like--has been argued to produce a condition of deep mediatization (Couldry & Hepp, 2013).
Everyday: Domestication of Mediatization or Mediatized Domestication?
The five approaches are: "technological determinism" (McLuhan); "mediatization of religion" (Hjarvard); "mediation of meaning" (Hoover); "mediation of sacred forms" (Lynch); and "social shaping of technology" (Campbell).
Just as the grand, static formats of old media--the giant movie screen, the TV presiding over every living room--have been undermined by the tiny, mobile, omnipresent interface of the wireless device, the heroic artistic projects that once sought to expose and deconstruct spectacle and mediatization have come to seem like artifacts of another age.
"Mediatization" refers to "the meta process by which everyday practices and social relations are historically shaped by mediating technologies and media organization" and is, according to some scholars, one of the key meta-processes shaping modernity, alongside individualization, commercialization, and globalization, by shaping communication and thus the very core of human action.