Middle English

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Middle English

the English language from about 1100 to about 1450: main dialects are Kentish, Southwestern (West Saxon), East Midland (which replaced West Saxon as the chief literary form and developed into Modern English), West Midland, and Northern (from which the Scots of Lowland Scotland and other modern dialects developed)
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References in periodicals archive ?
King returns the volume's focus to material experience in her article on the aural contexts of medieval English outdoor performance.
"The Legacy of Boethius in Medieval England" is unreservedly recommended for college and university library Medieval English collections and supplemental studies lists.
Lively and engaging, this collection of essays is the second half of an affectionate tribute to John McGavin, presented at the 2015 Medieval English Theatre Meeting (METh) in Southampton.
Called The Bowmen, it appeared in the London Evening Standard of September 29 1914 and has the soldiers saved by the spirits of medieval English archers (think Agincourt, Henry V, etc).
Urban Bodies: Communal Health in Late Medieval English Towns and Cities, by Carole Rawcliffe.
The group of professional vocal soloists will sing medieval English carols, Italian laude, Aquitanian hymns, Spanish villancicos and motets from France, Germany, Spain and England.
Biblical Paradigms in Medieval English Literature: From Coedmon to Malory.
Thousands of quirky medieval English surnames recorded in the Domesday Book are extinct or dying out.
The Late Medieval English Church: Vitality and Vulnerability before the Break with Rome.
F an shor We're also six miles north of Lichfield, boasting the only medieval English cathedral with three spires."
Lister Matheson considers the roles of women medieval English historical writings.
This collection of essays is the fourth in a new series 'Christianity and Culture: Issues in Teaching and Research'; its three predecessors concern Anglo-Saxon England, Medieval English Anchoritic and Mystical Texts, and Medieval English Romance.