Megachiroptera


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Related to Megachiroptera: Microchiroptera

Megachiroptera

[¦meg·ə·kī′räp·tə·rə]
(vertebrate zoology)
The fruit bats, a group of Chiroptera restricted to the Old World; most species lack a tail, but when present it is free of the interfemoral membrane.

Megachiroptera

 

a suborder of mammals of the order Chiroptera. In contrast to representatives of the other suborder of bats, Microchiroptera, many megachiropterans attain large dimensions (body length up to 42 cm, wingspread up to 1.5 m). However, small forms also exist (body length up to 6 cm). The tail in many species is absent. The teeth are smooth-crowned, adapted for crushing plant food. The eyes are large. Both vision and the sense of smell are well developed. The capacity for echolocation has been established only in Megachiropterans of the genus Rousettus, which live in caves.

Megachiropterans are distributed in tropical and subtropical regions of the eastern hemisphere as far north as Egypt, Asia Minor, and southern Japan; there are none in the USSR. The suborder has one family, Pteropodidae, which comprises about 200 species. Megachiropterans are active at night and at twilight. They spend the day in treetops, more rarely in caves or on cliffs. Some are sometimes active during the day. Megachiropterans usually live in large colonies. The female bears one offspring annually. Most megachiropterans feed on the fruit pulp of wild and cultivated plants. The small species feed on nectar and flower pollen and thus serve as pollinators of a number of tropical plants. They sometimes damage orchards. Representatives of the genus Pteropus, and sometimes all megachiropterans, are also called kalongs.

P. P. STRELKOV

References in periodicals archive ?
Torpy, 'Daytime Behaviour of the Grey-Headed Flying Fox Pteropus Poliocephalus Temminck (Pteropodidae: Megachiroptera) at an Autumn/Winter Roost', Australian Mammalogy, 28 (2006).
However very limited attention has been paid to the stomach of the Megachiroptera (Schultz, 1970; Halstead, 1975; Okon; Bhide; Madkour et al., 1982); and there is no published information about the stomach of Egyptian fruit bat, and in general there are few morphological studies on these species (Madkour, 1976; Abumandour, 2014; Abumandour & El-Bakary, 2013).
Screening was extended to include AdVs described in microchiroptera and megachiroptera bats (6,8,20).
A comparison to the only other adenovirus found in a bat (flying fox, order Megachiroptera) with the available sequence information of a [approximately equal to] 550-bp fragment of the DNA polymerase gene showed their distant relationship.
To investigate the presence of Lagos bat virus (LBV)-specific antibodies in megachiroptera from West Africa, we conducted fluorescent antibody virus neutralization tests.
The Kruger bat samples were collected from 3 species of fruit bats (Megachiroptera) and 12 species of insectivorous bats (Microchiroptera), including samples from 56 Chaerephon pumila, 32 Rousettus aegyptiacus, 27 Mops condylurus, 16 Hipposideros caffer, plus 57 samples from 11 other species.
Recent kagos bat virus isolations from bats (suborder Megachiroptera) in South Africa.
Cumulatively, all available evidence indicates that LBV is likely persistently maintained in Megachiroptera populations in South Africa and other African countries where LBV has been reported in the past.
From February 1,2000, to December 4, 2001, a total of 119 bats (85 Megachiroptera and 34 Microchiroptera) were tested for Australian bat lyssavirus (ABLV) infection.
Flying foxes like the one that captured van Gogh's imagination are very large fruit-eating bats (order Chiroptera, suborder Megachiroptera).
Because Nipah virus appears closely related to Hendra virus, wildlife surveillance focused primarily on pteropid bats (suborder Megachiroptera), a natural host of Hendra virus in Australia.