Mehmed II


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Mehmed II

 

known as Fatih (“the conqueror”). Born Mar. 30, 1432, in Edirne (Adrianople); died Apr. 3 (or May 3), 1481, in Hunkârçiri. Turkish sultan (reigned 1444; 1451–81).

Mehmed II conducted a policy of conquest and personally headed the campaigns of the Turkish Army. In 1453 he conquered Constantinople and made it the capital of the Ottoman Empire, thereby putting an end to Byzantium. Mehmed’s reign also saw the annexation of Serbia (1459), the conquest of Morea (1460), the Trabzon (Trebizond) Empire (1461), Bosnia (1463), and the island of Euboea (1471), the completion of the conquest of Albania (1479), and the subjugation of the Crimean Khanate (1475). The first law code of the Ottoman Empire was compiled under Mehmed II.

References in periodicals archive ?
Macedonians professing Christianity from the nearby villages started moving to the city which drove up the number of Macedonian artisans and merchants, who also played the main role in the restoration of the churches in and around the Bazaar, after Sultan Mehmed II allowed Christians to build churches on the territory of the Empire.
Las migraciones de pueblos enteros han marcado los hitos mas importantes de la historia humana; el 29 de mayo de 1453, los turcos musulmanes liderados por Mehmed II ingresaron en el imperio romano oriental y tomaron su capital, Constantinopla, dando termino a la Edad Media y surgiendo la epoca contemporanea que hoy conocemos como Estado Moderno.
The city of Byzantium, itself dating to 657 BC, was renamed Constantinople in 330 AD by the Christian emperor Constantine, and finally named Istanbul with the subjugation of the area by the Islamic conqueror Mehmed II in 1453.
This account of a son of Toulouse who became a star in North America was organized in partnership with the Musee des Augustins, which in addition to possessing the most complete group of works by the artist (thirteen of them, including the colossal Entry of the Sultan Mehmed II into Constantinople, which remains in Toulouse) also owns other icons of Orientalist painting, including Saint John Chrysostom and the Empress Eudoxia, by Jean-Paul Laurens, and The Massage, Hammam Scene, by Edouard Debat-Ponsan.
But when Sultan Mehmed II (Dominic Cooper of "History Boys" and "Mama Mia") demands 1,000 of Wallachia's boysincluding Vlad's own son, Ingeras (Art Parkinson of HBO's "Game of Thrones")be torn from their parents' homes and forced to become childsoldiers in his army, Vlad must decide: do the same as his father before him and give up his son to the sultan, or seek the help of a monster to defeat the Turks but ultimately doom his soul to a life of servitude.
The tranquillity is shattered when power-hungry Sultan Mehmed II (Dominic Cooper) decrees that 1,000 Transylvanian men plus Vlad's spirited son Ingeras (Art Parkinson) must join his army.
When the new Sultan, Vlad's childhood frienemy Mehmed II (Dominic Cooper), demands 1,000 Transylvanian youths as conscripts for his army--among them, Vlad's own son, Ingeras (Art Parkinson, cementing a very conspicuous "Game of Thrones" vibe)--the war-weary prince sees no option but to defy the Sultan's demands.
La invasion de Otranto fue consecuencia de la agresiva politica imperialista de Mehmed II (1451-1481) que, despues de la conquista de Constantinopla, continuaba su ambicioso plan de expansion a Oeste.
Mehmed II died the next year at age forty-nine, frustrating Ottoman plans for expansion." (A more detailed telling of the martyrs' story can be read at CatholicCulture.org: How the 800 martyrs of Otranto saved Rome.)
Though accusing the Ottoman sultan Mehmed II of "ruthless ambition" in seizing Constantinople, Harris demonstrates that the city had been such a strategic irritant to the Ottoman state that any responsible ruler would have wanted to take it (196).
of Massachusetts) and Hanak (emeritus, history, Shepherd U.) provides a critical evaluation of the voluminous sources (including those neglected by modern historians) relevant to the two-month siege and subsequent fall of the city of Constantinople to the Ottoman Turks led by Sultan Mehmed II in 1453.
Your move reminded us Sultan Mehmed II the Conqueror who started a new era after conquering Istanbul in 1453.