Mehmed II

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Mehmed II

 

known as Fatih (“the conqueror”). Born Mar. 30, 1432, in Edirne (Adrianople); died Apr. 3 (or May 3), 1481, in Hunkârçiri. Turkish sultan (reigned 1444; 1451–81).

Mehmed II conducted a policy of conquest and personally headed the campaigns of the Turkish Army. In 1453 he conquered Constantinople and made it the capital of the Ottoman Empire, thereby putting an end to Byzantium. Mehmed’s reign also saw the annexation of Serbia (1459), the conquest of Morea (1460), the Trabzon (Trebizond) Empire (1461), Bosnia (1463), and the island of Euboea (1471), the completion of the conquest of Albania (1479), and the subjugation of the Crimean Khanate (1475). The first law code of the Ottoman Empire was compiled under Mehmed II.

References in periodicals archive ?
Famous for having been built in a mere four months, the Rumeli Fortress was built by Mehmet II. The fortress houses a mosque, a fountain, cistern, cellars, stores and barracks for the army.
"Fetih 1453" tells the story of Mehmet II, who ascends to the Ottoman throne after the deaths of his father Murat II and brother Osman Erciyes.
While inaccuracies exist, perhaps the most rewarding parts of Mihailovic's account are his assessments of Sultan Mehmet II (Machomet in this text) under whom he served, the components of the Ottoman administrative and military machine, and the problems Christian kingdoms faced when confronting that military.
Much needed funds will be donated for entrance restoration of the UNESCO World Heritage Site which was built in 1465 by Sultan Mehmet II and housed Ottman royalty for 400 years.
The film tells of Sultan Mehmet II, a national icon today, and his 50-day siege of Constantinople, the last bastion of the Byzantine empire.
The church was turned into a mosque after Constantinople was taken by Sultan Mehmet II in 1453.
Facsimiles of the first copy of the Holy Quran in Islam, the original of which was presented to Ottoman Sultan Mehmet II in 1811 AD by Ottoman Governor of Egypt Mehmet Ali and of the largest Ottoman Quran commissioned by the Ottoman Sultan Subyman the Magnificent in 16th century; models of centuries-old mosques, hospitals and universities in Edirne and Istanbul (both in Turkey), Iran, Iraq and Saudi Arabia; Islamic arts; calligraphies; and other Islamic artifacts from across the world fill the museum.
Even more immediately threatening was young Mehmet II, the Turkish sultan who conquered the last remnant of the Eastern Roman Empire in 1453.
He notes other fascinating details as well: if notoriously reclusive sultans such as Murad III [1574-1595] were an exception, the pressures of a life lived in public affected all sultans, with Mehmet II, conqueror of Istanbul in 1453, the first sultan to express a desire to dine occasionally in private apart from his vizier.
Paul II was a legitimate pope, resident in Rome and not in the Palais des Papes in the south of France, but he still had to deal with the rising influence of the cardinalate, the intellectual appeal of conciliarism (a notion that sought to subordinate papal power to that of a council), the shifting priorities of the larger realms of France and the Holy Roman Empire, and the external threat of the Ottoman Turks under the brilliant and fearsome Sultan Mehmet II. If that were not enough, he had heresy and apostasy growing like weeds in the Eternal City itself.
This biography of Sultan Mehmet II, the conqueror, is focused on the historic conflict between western Europe and the Ottoman empire, echoed today in the case of Turkey, which is currently facing rejection in its attempt to join the EU.
It was converted into a mosque after Sultan Mehmet II (The Conquerer) conquered Istanbul in 1453.