Meissen


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Meissen

(mīs`ən), city (1994 pop. 33,075), Saxony, E central Germany, on the Elbe River. A porcelain manufacturing center since 1710, Meissen is famous for its delicate figurines (often called "Dresden" china); the industry is supported by local deposits of kaolin and potter's earth. Other manufactures include metal products, ceramics, and leather goods. Meissen was founded (929) by Henry of Saxony (later German king as Henry I), and it became (965) the seat of the margraviate of Meissen, where the WettinWettin
, German dynasty, which ruled in Saxony, Thuringia, Poland, Great Britain, Belgium, and Bulgaria. It takes its name from a castle on the Saale near Halle. The family gained prominence in the 10th cent.
..... Click the link for more information.
 dynasty of Saxony originated. The diocese of Meissen was founded in 968, was suppressed in 1581, and was restored in 1921 with its see at Bautzen. The Albrechtsburg (15th cent.), a large castle, dominates the city; it housed (1710–1864) the royal porcelain manufacture, begun by J. F. Böttger under the patronage of Elector Frederick Augustus I (Augustus II of Poland). Among the other noteworthy buildings of Meissen are the cathedral and the Church of St. Afra (both 13th–15th cent.).

Meissen

 

a city in the German Democratic Republic, in the district of Dresden, at the foot of the Burg mountain massif. Population, 45,600 (1970).

Meissen has been well known for a long time as a center for the porcelain and ceramic industry. Other industries include machine building, metalworking, and jute processing. Manufactures include leather footwear and glazes and paints for ceramics. There is beer production. Among Meissen’s educational institutions are a higher school of agricultural production cooperatives and an engineering school. Deposits of high quality kaolin and clay are located near the city.

A cathedral and castle complex has been preserved on a cliff overlooking the Elbe River. The complex includes the Gothic cathedral of Saints Johannes and Donatus (mid-13th to 15th centuries), which was originally a basilica but became a hall church in the 14th century; its two towers were added in the early 20th century. The principal building in the complex is the Albrechtsburg castle (1471–85; architect, Arnold of Westphalia), which is an example of late Gothic architecture and has lavish stonework. Another late Gothic structure in the complex is the bishop’s palace (late 15th to early 16th centuries; rebuilt, 1912).

Other buildings in Meissen include the Frauenkirche (late 15th century) and the Franziskanerkirche (mid-15th century; now the City Museum). There is an art collection in Albrechtsburg castle, and a museum is located in the Meissen State Porcelain Manufactory.

REFERENCE

Mrusek, H. J. Meissen. Dresden [1957].

Meissen

a town in E Germany, in Saxony, in Dresden district on the River Elbe: famous for its porcelain (Dresden china), first made here in 1710. Pop.: 28 640 (2003 est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Although, in 1919 the Meissen factory submitted to the German Finance Ministry a proposal for a national emergency coinage in the form of a seven-piece sample set of stoneware coins ranging in denomination from 10 pfennigs to 5 marks, the idea was ultimately rejected by the Reichsbank as impractical (Ringleb, 1986: 42).
The Meissen porcelain lots include several figures of parts and parakeets.
These were items intended to rival Meissen and Chinese export porcelain, and sit on dining tables groaning with fine silver.
Following a strategy explored by a number of museums in recent years, Frick curator Charlotte Vignon invited Shechet to choose works from the institution's collection (or rather from an independent collection, that of the Meissen collector Henry Arnhold, parts of which are either promised or already given to the museum) and create an installation from them, including works of her own.
Ingo Bade, chair of the Hong Kong-based Meissen Asia Pacific board of directors, likened Augustus' hands-on style in the 1700s to that of a present-day chief executive officer who has to approve all designs and innovative concepts fresh from the drawing board.
In an attempt to undermine competition from other porcelain manufacturers, the king imposed import duties on Meissen and other non-French companies and also banned French factories from making sculpture and using gold and multi-coloured decoration, leaving Sevres with a virtual monopoly in what it did best.
Bacall's brand of panache was uniquely American, Meissen said.
It is rare to encounter an author who can compare the works of Shakespeare with those of Goethe or Schiller, but it is an even rarer occurrence when the author compares the Bard to Meissen porcelain and aspects of German architecture after 1750.
Work produced during her sixmonth residency at Meissen Porcelain Manufactory will be shown at the Rhode Island School of Design on December 2013 through June 2014.
WHEN Germany's iconic Meissen porcelain comes together with semi- autobiographical pop Indian imagery, bright and shiny sparks are bound to fly.
Police were searching Sunday for the other vehicles including the van that was meant to supposed to take the bodies to a crematorium in Meissen in Saxony in eastern Germany.
A varied porcelain section resulted in the following prices - a Tazza from the wedding Service of Grand Duke Konstantin Nikolaevick dating from 1848 pounds 480, Meissen Sauce Boat pounds 320 and a circa 1780 Rue Thiroux cup and saucer pounds 360.