Nevus

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Related to Melanocytic nevus: Ancient Melanocytic Nevus, Dysplastic nevus

naevus

(US), nevus
any congenital growth or pigmented blemish on the skin; birthmark or mole

Nevus

 

(mole, birthmark), a congenital malformation of the skin in which some areas differ in color from the rest of the skin and/or have a peculiar warty appearance. Nevi are not confined to any particular area. They can be present at birth or develop during the first few years of life or even later.

Vascular nevi, or hemangiomas, are characterized by varying sizes, uneven edges, and a pink or bluish red color. They become pale when pressed and may be flat, superficial (capillary nevi), or nodular. They are embedded in the thickest part of the skin and have an uneven cavernous surface (cavernous nevi). Verrucoid nevi occur as singular or multiple patches of different shapes, are muddy gray or brown in color, and have an uneven keratotic surface. Pigmented nevi are light brown to almost black in color; they can be the size of a pinhead, or they can cover large areas of the skin. The surfaces of pigmented nevi may be uneven and covered with hair (Becker’s nevi).

Self-treatment of pigmented spots is dangerous because frequent injury may cause them to degenerate into melanomas, whereupon the nevi enlarge, become firmer, and change color. New pigmented spots may appear in the same area, and the regional lymph nodes may become enlarged.

Electrocoagulation, cryotherapy, surgical dissection, and radiotherapy are used to treat nevi.

REFERENCE

Shanin, A. P. “Nevusy.” In Mnogotomnoe rukovodstvo po dermatologii, vol. 3. Moscow, 1964.

I. IA. SHAKHTMEISTER

nevus

[′nē·vəs]
(medicine)
A lesion containing melanocytes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pseudomelanoma: recurrent melanocytic nevus following partial surgical removal.
Meyerson nevus is a rare entity, described as a symmetrical erythema and scale over or around centrally localized melanocytic nevus due to eczemation.
One case of benign melanocytic nevus was a 66-yearold man with a diagnosis of bullous lupus, with a dark brown macula on the back, for an unknown time, with no local symptoms, and with no melanoma history (lesion 16).
To further confirm the expression pattern of PVT1 in melanoma, we collected 30 malignant melanoma tissues and 20 age and gender-matched skin tissues with melanocytic nevus and measured PVT1 expression by qPCR.
Congenital melanocytic nevus was located on the forehead as a single lesion of a baby boy (Fig.
In all eight cases, melanomas developed in areas that were uncovered or only partially covered by clothing--the upper back, lower thigh, and calf--and all but one were associated with an atypical or congenital melanocytic nevus.
And even rarer congenital melanocytic nevus, garment nevus (also called cape or bathing-trunk nevus), have a higher incidence of melanoma.
Of the 1032 true-negative lesions, the diagnoses included seborrheic keratosis/solar lentigo in 120 cases and benign melanocytic nevus in 912 cases.
In five patients of Becker's nevi, three had nevus depigmentosus, one had nevus spilus and one had congenital melanocytic nevus. Three patients with Becker's nevi had associated nevus depigmentosus - only one such co-occurrence has been reported previously.14 In addition, one each had congenital melanocytic nevus and nevus spilus, which are also unreported incidents (Figure 4).
We recently reported two female cases with tumor-negative anti-NMDAR encephalitis after resection of melanocytic nevus.[sup][16] Our observation suggests a possible link between AIE and melanocytic nevus.
Giant congenital melanocytic nevus. National Organization for Rare Disorders Web site.