Meleager


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Meleager

(mĕlēā`jər), hero in Greek mythology. He was the son of Oeneus, king of Calydon, and Althaea. When Meleager was born, a prophecy said that he would die when a certain log in the fire was burned. His mother snatched the log from the fire and hid it. Meleager grew to be a famous warrior. When Oeneus failed to sacrifice to Artemis, the goddess sent a huge wild boar to ravage his land. To kill the boar Greece's bravest heroes were summoned. Those who came included Castor and Pollux, Theseus, Jason, Nestor, and Atalanta. Meleager led the hunt, known as the Calydonian hunt, and killed the boar. He gave its pelt to Atalanta, with whom he had fallen in love. When his mother's brothers tried to take the pelt, Meleager killed them. In revenge, his mother angrily burned the hidden log, and Meleager died as prophesied. In Homer, the Atalanta account is absent, and Meleager is killed in a battle for possession of the pelt.
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Meleager

death would come when firebrand burned up. [Gk. Myth.: Walsh Classical, 186]
See: Fate
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(31.) For the myth of Meleager see Gantz 1993, 8; for the role of
Mr Grosvenor said he believed it was a precursor to Jordaens's painting of the mythical huntress Atalanta and her suitor, Meleager, in the Prado art gallery in Madrid.
I learned to write from authors like Callimachus and Meleager, including the Roman elegists (Catullus and Propertius, but less so Tibullus), and the indispensable Martial and Ausonius.
Most of the 20 essays are in German; the nine in English consider such topics as Job's wife and the struggle for Job's transformation, different approaches to evil and death in the ethics of the non-canonical Jewish writings, the post-mortem divisions of the dead in 1 Enoch 22:1-13, death and cultus as constitutive of the human in the Epistle to the Hebrews, and narrating Meleager's deeds and death in words and images.
Amber, too, is associated in classical legend with mourning and commemoration, being the concentration of the tears of the sisters of Meleager, bewailing the death of their brother: by implication, family history, as amber's 'reverse', might be imagined as a form of forgetting, of not commemorating those who have been lost.
(16.) According to his biography by Sainte-Beuve, Chateaubriand and his friend Louis de Fontanes used to promenade in the Tuileries gardens, where there stood a statue of Meleager and the Calydonian boar (II: 122).
He might have helped to weave the garland of Meleager, or to mix the lapis lazuli of Fra Angelico, or to chase the delicate truth in the shade of an Athenian palaestra, or his hands might have fashioned those ethereal faces that smile in the niches of Chartres.
The huge boar's head with which Hercules entertains the centaurs in the Silver Age reappears in the Brazen Age in the Meleager story; while Cerberus's three heads and the lion's head in the Silver Age reappear as trophies in Brazen Age.
1499), Marcus Argentarius to hands ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], AP 9.270.4), Meleager to a garland ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], AP 12.257.6) and Castorion to the animal-like Pan ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], 2.5 Bergk = 310 Campbell 1993).