Meliaceae


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Meliaceae

[‚mel·ē′ās·ē‚ē]
(botany)
A family of dicotyledonous plants in the order Sapindales characterized by mostly exstipulate, alternate leaves, stamens mostly connate by their filaments, and syncarpous flowers.

Meliaceae

 

(mahogany) a family of dicotyledonous plants, including trees, shrubs, and, less frequently, subshrubs and grasses. The leaves are exstipulate and usually pinnate. The flowers are small and in axillary inflorescences. There are four or five sepals and the same number of petals. In most species the stamens have fused into a tube. The fruit is a capsule, berry, or drupe. There are approximately 50 genera, with 1,400 species, distributed primarily in the tropics. In the USSR one species of Cedrela and several species of Melia are cultivated. A number of species, such as mahogany, West Indian sandalwood, and yellowwood, yield valuable lumber, which is distinctively colored and fragrant. Several species yield essential oil (Cedrela and others), edible fruits (Lansium domesticum var. domestica, Lansium d. var. pubescens, and Sandoricum indicum), or alkaloids (carapine, naregamine, and others).

References in periodicals archive ?
Other previously reported SE protocols for Meliaceae used zygotic embryos as starting material (Cameron, 2010; Pena-Ramirez et al., 2011).
Antifeedant and insecticide properties of a limonoid from Melia azedarach (Meliaceae) with potential use for pest management.
Antifeedant activity and effects of fruits and seeds extracts of Cabralea canjerana (Vell.) Mart.(Meliaceae) on the immature stages of the fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda (JE Smith)(Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).
Researchers who have worked with Meliaceae species suggested that somatic embryo-genesis was obtained from certain pro-embryogenic cells without the presence of auxin in the culture medium, such as 2.4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (Sharry and Teixeira, 2006).
Antifeedant and insecticide properties of a limnoid from Melia azedarach (Meliaceae) with potencial use for pest management.
Vijayalakshmi, "GCMS-MS analysis of Trichilia connaroides (Wight & Arn.) Bentv (Meliaceae): a tree of ethnobotanical records," Asian Journal of Plant Science and Research, vol.
Maia, "Antiplasmodial activity of the andiroba (Carapa guianensis Aubl., Meliaceae) oil and its limonoid-rich fraction," Journal ofEthnopharmacology, vol.
From the physiognomic point of view, the authors also mentioned the Sapindaceae, Salicaceae, Meliaceae, Boraginaceae, Moraceae, Arecaceae and Sapotaceae families.
Previous phylogenetic studies of the Meliaceae based on cpDNA resulted in polytomies (Muellner et al., 2009) suggesting that hybridization may be common.
Meliaceae plants are used in ecologically-based production systems, and their use has been highlighted in studies about pest population control.
(1-3) The leaves and fruits of this member of the Meliaceae family have been found to exhibit anthelmintic and antifeedant activity toward insects.