Melopoeia


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Melopoeia

 

in ancient Greece, the creation of melos, or melody; the melodic embodiment of a poetic text. Ancient Greek music theory included a special branch that was basically a systematization of phenomena related to melopoeia. The term came into use again in Western Europe during the Renaissance, usually with reference to the teaching of composition, which was also known as musica poetica. In the 19th and 20th centuries the term “melopoeia”has been used rarely. It is considered synonymous with “melodies.”

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Stevenson's Silverado Squatters contains no sentences as long, but it does contain two moments of extended ekphrasis, two of the best passages in the book, distinguished by both phanopoeia and melopoeia.
There are three kinds of melopoeia, that is, verse made to sing; to chant or intone; and to speak.
4) Ver, por ejemplo, los textos de Charles Perrone, que se centra en la recepcion internacional de la pelicula de Camus ("Myth, Melopoeia and Mimesis"); Marilia Scaff Rocha Ribeiro, que compara las dos versiones filmicas a partir de su tratamiento de la figura de Orfeu ("Variations on the Brazilian Orpheus Theme"); Jonathon Grasse, que se centra especificamente en el rol de la musica en las versiones filmicas de la obra ("Conflation and Conflict in Brazilian Popular Music"); Jared Banks, que estudia desde un punto de vista formalista la adaptacion de la obra teatral al cine ("Cinematic Adaptation: Orfeu Negro da Conceicao") y Edwin Murillo, que propone una defensa de los meritos de la version filmica ("Orfeu Carioca: Reassessing Orphic Mythology in Rio de Janeiro").
Melopoeia indicates that the words create a type of music and that the meaning of this sound surpasses the meaning of the poem's words or syntax.
In his 1929 essay "How to Read," Pound distinguished three "kinds of poetry," three different aspects of language upon which a poet could choose to concentrate: phanopoeia, melopoeia, and logopoeia.
Pound's later poetic formulations in How to Read further define the process through the terms melopoeia, phanopoeia, and logopoeia, which deal respectively with aural, visual, and verbal dimensions of poetry.
07]] 1 Calvsij Melodiae Erfurt [Sethus Calvisius, Melopoeia sive melodiae (Erfurt, 1592), RISM B/VI/I ([section]), 198] 11 Introductio Musicae in [4.
Thus, the early Pound's concern for poetry as "an art of verbal music," as Smith properly defines, can be seen as originating the soft or feminine in Pound, and Pound's transition from soft to hard (11) is, in other words, "the move from the melopoeia of the early poems" to "the issuing of priestly directives in the later work"; "Pound acts as the paternal Moses-figure, a law-giver who is proprietor to a certain truth and morality which must be made available (monumentally) to the erring masses" (42).
Ezra Pound, el sumo sacerdote de la poesia moderna, sostenia que hay tres clases de poesia (6): Primera, la Melopoeia, donde las palabras estan cargadas por sobre y mas alla de su significado comun, de alguna propiedad musical que dirige el rumbo y la tendencia de ese significado.
Before moving on to Pound's key achievements in Cathay and Propertius, I suppose I'd better explain that the absence of the sanctified taxonomy of Poundian verse --symbolism, imagism, vorticism, logopoeia, melopoeia, Ideogrammic Method, phanopoeia, et hoc genus omne--here is motivated by a conviction that these counters were always at best uselessly vague and volatile, at worst obfuscatory.
It is also related to that of phanopoeia, one of the three major poetic modes formulated by Pound (the other two being melopoeia and logopoeia) who defines it as "a casting of images upon the visual imagination" (Literary Essays 25).
Por otra parte, se trata de una eleccion estrategica astuta: Huidobro afirma que desea hacer una poesia traducible, que no este basada en las particularidades especificas de cada lengua, porque es esa la poesia que el sabe que puede escribir en frances: una poesia que, en terminos de la famosa distincion propuesta por Ezra Pound, se base no en la logopoeia ni en la melopoeia, sino en lo que Pound llama la fanopoeia, la capacidad del lenguaje poetico de suscitar imagenes (y recordemos que, al formular esta distincion, el propio Pound observa que la logopoeia y la melopoeia raramente pueden traducirse, mientras que en general la fanopoeia pasa sin problemas de un idioma a otro).