Melouprey

Melouprey

 

a settlement of the late Neolithic period and the Bronze and early Iron ages in northern Cambodia. It was excavated in 1939-40 by the French scholar P. Levy. The Neolithic layer (second millennium B.C.) yielded polished axes and adzes and pottery with incised geometric designs. The Bronze Age layer (first millennium B.C.) contained numerous celts, bronze daggers, and bracelets shaped like a T in cross section. The pottery comprised round-bottomed vessels and vessels with applied ornaments. The artifacts closely resemble the finds from the upper layers of Somrongsen and are related to the Dong Son culture and the Bronze Age cultures of central Indonesia. The Iron Age layers yielded pottery made on the potter’s wheel, iron hoes, and other artifacts.

REFERENCE

Levy, P. Recherches prehistoriques dans la region de Mlu-Prei. Hanoi, 1943.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lamotte suggested that Dak Lak, in the present-day Central Highlands of Vietnam, be given to Annam, and that Melouprey and Tonle Repou--the historical frontier with Champasak--be ceded to Cambodia.
35) In 1885, King Norodom requested the aid of the French to delineate Melouprey and Xelamphao (Tonle Repou), which he claimed for Cambodia, the latter being the name of the river that presently marks the Laos-Cambodia border west of the Mekong River (Breazeale, 'The integration of the Lao states into the Thai kingdom').
As one account artfully put it, Cambodia's nominal king had `shown signs of disaffection', yet Rama II withdrew to avoid confrontation with the Vietnamese while continuing to occupy the Cambodian provinces of Melouprey and Stung Treng.