Menaechmi


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Menaechmi

comedy, by Plautus, about mistakes involving identical twins. [Rom. Lit.: Menaechmi]
See: Twins
References in periodicals archive ?
Witzke's "'I knew I had a brother!': Fraternity and Identity in Plautus's Menaechmi and Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest" asserts that Plautus's play and Wilde's play are "rarely considered together" (321).
(43) In Plautus, the Menaechmi is an expose of a terrible marriage in which Menaechmus I is kept by his wife from all his pleasures and has to face her constant nagging.
Shakespeare's comedy is often romantic comedy derived from the New Comedy of Plautus and Terence, and some have classical locales like The Comedy of Errors, in which Shakespeare multiplies the twins from his model, Plautus's Menaechmi, and Troilus and Cressida represents an aspect of the Trojan War in a manner far more comic than in Homer's epic rendition in The Iliad.
One of the earliest, and easily the shortest of Shakespeare's plays -- "which might have an appeal for some audiences," laughs Colin -- A Comedy of Errors is basically a modernised adaptation of Menaechmi by Plautus.
To begin her study, Low explores the thematic differences between Plautus's The Menaechmi and Shakespeare's The Comedy of Errors to argue that the designs of their respective stages engendered thematic differences in the plays themselves.
Plautus (Trinummus 1177; Menaechmi 776) and Terence (Eunuch 978).
A Comparison of the Characters in The Comedy of Errors with those in the Menaechmi. Studies in English, 5, 79-95.
Cervantes almost certainly came across Boccaccio's story by an indirect route, in Timoneda's Tres comedias, which contained adaptations of Plautus's Amphitryo and Menaechmi, and a reworking of the questione de amore in the introito y argumento of the former play (ff.
An example is the wife of Menaechmus in Plautus's comedy Menaechmi, who summons her father and petitions for divorce when she discovers that her husband has been stealing her fine clothing and bestowing it upon his mistress next door.
(7) Fraenkel (1922, 299-301) agreed, seeing parallels to Menaechmi 775-802, in which a father rebukes his daughter for complaining about her husband.
The topics include Dionysus' choice in Frogs and Aristophanes' parenetic pedigree, the reception of comedy in the ancient novel, Titus Andronicus as an illustration of the link between Roman comedy and Renaissance revenge drama, Lysistrata on Broadway, and Plautus' Menaechmi in English translation.