Manasseh

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Manasseh

(mənăs`ē) [Heb.,=making to forget], in the Bible. 1 First son of JosephJoseph,
one of the heroes of the patriarchal narratives of the Book of Genesis. He is presented as the favored son of Jacob and Rachel, sold as a boy into slavery by his brothers, who were jealous of Joseph's dreams and of his coat of many colors given him by Jacob.
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 by his Egyptian wife, Asenath, and eponymous ancestor of one of the 12 tribes of Israel. Manasseh received land on both sides of the Jordan River. In Palestine his tribe occupied the land just S of the Vale of Jezreel; on the other side, Manasseh received land E of Gad.

2 King of JudahJudah,
in the Bible, the southern of the two kingdoms remaining after the division of the kingdom of the Jews that occurred under Rehoboam. The northern kingdom, Israel, was continually at war with Judah.
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 (c.687–642 B.C.), son and successor of HezekiahHezekiah
, in the Bible, king of Judah, son and successor of Ahaz. During his reign Sennacherib of Assyria routed (701 B.C.) the rebellious Jews, laid seige to Jerusalem, and exacted a high indemnity from them.
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. Under Manasseh, Judah reached a low point of moral and spiritual degradation. The Jewish Prayer of Manasseh, included in the Old Testament ApocryphaApocrypha
[Gr.,=hidden things], term signifying a collection of early Jewish writings excluded from the canon of the Hebrew scriptures. It is not clear why the term was chosen.
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 of the Authorized Version and the New Revised Standard Version, is a penitential psalm, purporting to be the king's prayer in captivity.

Manasseh

idolatrously and murderously leads Jerusalem astray. [O.T.: II Kings 21:2–4, 9]

Manasseh

Old Testament
1. the elder son of Joseph (Genesis 41:51)
2. the Israelite tribe descended from him
3. the territory of this tribe, in the upper Jordan valley
References in periodicals archive ?
Fueled in part by some of Menasseh ben Israel's theories, there was an association between the New World and the Lost Tribes of Israel in the 17th century.
Durante sus meses amstelodanos le asegura a Menasseh ben Israel haber visto en un "pueblo escondido" de los Andes suramericanos (mas precisamente en Nueva Granada, actual Colombia), una tribu indigena que celebraba un oficio religioso judio acompanado de recitaciones en hebreo.
(58) Lewis, Art of Matthew Paris, 303 and Amishai-Maisels, "Menasseh Ben Israel," 60.
In the copy of Yalkut Hadash examined, there are slight differences at the bottom of the frame from that employed by Menasseh Ben Israel, but the essential frame and the eagle are unchanged.
This supposed discovery gave an impulse to messianic hopes in Europe, particularly on the part of Rabbi Menasseh ben Israel, in Amsterdam, who wrote a book about this narrative, TheHope of Israel.
Also of note is her subtle treatment of William Prynne, Oliver Cromwell, Gerrard Winstanley, Margaret Fell, George Fox, and Menasseh Ben Israel, as well as of self-proclaimed prophets such as John Rogers, Abiezzer Coppe, and Anna Trapnel.
Claro esta que esta no fue la interpretracion que le dio Menasseh ben Israel al soprendente testimonio de Montezinos.
There is an entire chapter (6) devoted to information concerning the High Priest from the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, English accounts of these sources, the Apocrypha, and contemporary materials relevant to the problem, including the life and work of Menasseh ben Israel, John Dury, John Reeve, Lodowick Muggleton, John Robins, and others.
4) between the expulsion of the Jews in 1290 and the visit of Rabbi Menasseh ben Israel in 1655, the year after Selden's death.
(3) "Margaret Fell's writing to Menasseh ben Israel and the Jews are a typical expression of the fervor felt both by Jewish Messianists and Christian millenarians for the cosmic significance of the decade of the 1650s as well in anticipation of the hoped-for 'second-coming' year 1666" (Kunze 211).
It was Cromwell who re-admitted Jews, in response to a pamphlet written by Rabbi Menasseh Ben Israel.
"Menasseh Ben Israel and the Dutch Sephardic Colonization Movement of the Mid-seventeenth Century, 1645-1657" En Menasseh Ben Israel and his World, editado por Y.