Mencken


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Mencken

H(enry) L(ouis). 1880--1956, US journalist and literary critic, noted for The American Language (1919): editor of the Smart Set and the American Mercury, which he founded (1924)
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During the period after World War I and before the onset of the 1930s, Mencken's fame reached its zenith.
Lovecraft, and Ambrose Bierce--with a fine eye for readability over reputation, has assembled a selection of Mencken's Evening Sun "Free Lance" columns of 1911-1915 into a book called A Saturnalia of Bunk and contributed an informative introduction to it.
About a decade after his book on Nietzsche, Mencken made his mark as one of the most vigorous of literary rabble-rousers with an essay that savaged Puritanism as a force in American writing.
In 2006 Mencken's Nietzsche was given new life and near-classic status in a Barnes and Noble paperback edition reprinted as part of its "library of essential reading." Now one could find Mencken alongside Dickens, Franklin, Yeats, and other approved masters in the largest bookstore chain in America.
At times, Coolidge makes it hard not to agree with Mencken's harsh assessment.
Mencken one of the greatest American social critics and journalists would likely say today that we too willingly accept the antics of the poltroons and cads who pass themselves off as our political leaders.
Mencken. That great journalist, whose career ended the year Mailer's began, was half in love with the scoundrels and hypocrites he wrote about, and he was incapable of writing a sentence that was not shamelessly entertaining.
The two letters I am referring to are: One: "Mencken Still Controversial." OH PLEASE!
This new edition is brought up to today's quality of books, but Mencken's original message remains strong, enhanced with an afterward from Pulitzer prize winning Anthony Lewis and an introduction from a biographer on Mencken Marion Elizabeth Rodgers.
MENCKEN'S LOW OPINION OF THE POST-CIVIL WAR SOUTH IS OBVIOUS in every mocking detail of "Sahara of the Bozart" (1920).
Mencken observed: "The chief value of money lies in the fact that one lives in a world in which it is overestimated." I bet that not one of the blessed 946 would buy that line for a second.
Mencken put it this way many decades ago: "The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed--and hence clamorous to be led to safety--by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary."