Mendeleev Ridge


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Mendeleev Ridge

 

a submarine ridge in the central part of the Arctic Ocean. It extends for approximately 1,500 km from the vicinity of VrangeP Island to the central part of the Lomonosov Ridge. The minimum depth over the ridge is approximately 1,500 m. It was discovered in 1949 by a Soviet high-latitude aerial expedition and is named after D. I. Mendeleev.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
If Russia proves that the Lomonosov Ridge and the Mendeleev Ridge are an extension of the Russian continental shelf, the country will receive the right to the additional 1.2 million square kilometers in the Arctic and to the development of huge oil and gas fields in the triangle formed by the Chukotka Peninsula, Murmansk and the North Pole.
The scientist said that a series of studies, including sample drilling at a depth of over 2,500 meters, have provided sufficient evidence to prove that that the Lomonosov and the Mendeleev Ridges are made of continental crust about 460-470 million years old.
Dove, D., Coakley, B., Hopper, J., Kristoffersen, Y., and the HLY0503 geophysics team, 2010, Bathymetry controlled source seismic and gravity observations of the Mendeleev ridge; Implications for ridge structure, origin, and regional tectonics: Geophysical Journal International, v.
(15) In 2001, Russia submitted as the first nation of the Arctic Five its prolongation of the continental shelf claim to the CLCS, which basically includes parts of the Barents Sea as well as the Lomonosov and Mendeleev Ridge. The claimed area shows a triangular shaped form (with the arches closing the eastern and western flank of Russia's northern border), topping at the North Pole.