Mendelian genetics


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Mendelian genetics

[men′dēl·yən jə′ned·iks]
(genetics)
Scientific study of the role of the nuclear genome in heredity, as opposed to cytoplasmic inheritance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Today, science limits Mendelian genetics to the explanation of simple dominant-recessive schemes, acknowledging that genetic variation within a group may exceed variation between groups.
Nazi intellectuals interpreted Mendelian genetics as validation of Nazism's concepts of racial purity.
This included a review of the concepts of variation, adaptation and fitness as used in evolution, structure and function of DNA, Mendelian genetics and the role that variation plays in natural selection, biogeography, geological time and extinction.
Burbank had begun his work before Mendelian genetics that revealed the mechanism of inheritance became widely accepted, and he rejected some of its sterner dictates (in some cases correctly, Smith notes).
While most geneticists ridiculed the idea that this was possible, (1,2) there have been some weak attempts to apply Mendelian genetics to the story by Jacob choosing spotted sheep that were homozygous (that is, two identical DNA sequences at one locus) rather than heterozygous (that is, two different alleles at one locus).
And as Ruse shows us (Chapter 1), although only few were originally convinced that natural selection can be the cause of evolution, the 20th century integration of Darwinian selectionism and Mendelian genetics definitively confirmed that Darwin started the major revolution in our thinking about the nature of evolutionary process.
Other topics include orthology and functional conservation in eukaryotes, mammalian meiotic recombination hot spots, epigenetic control of centromere behavior, Mendelian genetics of apomixis in plants, and immunoglobulin somatic hypermutatoin.
He also taught a graduate course on Mendelian genetics, many guest lectures, as well as short courses in the USA and abroad.
Historically, the ideas of Lamarck (1744-1829), that evolution occurs when parent organisms pass on to their offspring characteristics they have acquired during their lifetimes began to be ridiculed after they were superseded by Darwinism and Mendelian genetics.
In 1911, barely 10 years after the principles of what we now term Mendelian genetics became generally recognized, Wilhelm Johannsen, a Danish botanist, introduced the term "gene".
Before the emergence of modern Mendelian genetics, the environmental and breeding components of eugenics were not clearly distinguishable.