Ménière's syndrome

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Related to Meniere's syndrome: tinnitus, multiple sclerosis

Ménière's syndrome

(mən-yĕrz`), disorder of the inner ear characterized by recurrent episodes of loss of balance combined with deafness and a ringing sensation. It was first described by the French otologist Prosper Ménière, in 1861. The sufferer experiences severe dizziness, in which objects may seem to spin around, and often nausea, vomiting, and sweating. Attacks may last for several hours. In the disorder, which occurs most often in men between the ages of 40 and 60, the cochlear duct of the inner ear is found to be enlarged, as a result of acoustic trauma, viral endolymphatic labyrinthitis, and ototoxic drugs. The damage produced by these factors cause lesions or disturbances in the inner ear. The disease is treated by administration of antihistamines, anticholinergic agents (e.g., atropine or scopolamine), or diuretics. Surgical procedures that relieve the condition include vestibular neurectomy, labyrinthectomy, sacculotomy (placement of a stainless steel tack through the footplate of the stapes), ultrasonic irradiation, endolymphatic-subarachnoid shunt, and cryosurgery for relief of frequent vertiginous attacks and degenerative hearing.

Ménière's syndrome

[¦mā·nē¦erz ‚sin‚drōm]
(medicine)
A disease of the inner ear characterized by deafness, vertigo, and tinnitus; possibly an allergic process. Also known as labyrinthine syndrome
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Cochlear implantation in patients with bilateral Meniere's Syndrome. Otol Neurotol 2003;24: 397-403.
The patient's response to the alternate stimulus in the left car was inconsistent, which is not unusual early in Meniere's syndrome. In such cases, the cool response indicates a form of vestibular recruitment and the warm response is low.
The author describes the case of a 68-year-old woman who experienced severe symptoms of Meniere's syndrome. Ultrasonography of the neck detected a clot in the left internal jugular vein.
For example, diuretics are used to reduce the overall fluid volume to the inner ear as part of the management of Meniere's syndrome. However, their primary effect is a reduction of fluid systemically, with probably only a very slight fluid reduction in the inner ear.
Immune mechanisms in Meniere's syndrome. Otolaryngol Clin North Am 1997;30:1017-26.
This acquired form of endolymphatic hydrops or Meniere's syndrome includes cases in which a documented insult has been caused by either inflammation or trauma to a previously normal labyrinth.
[13] Hughes et al reported that more than 50% of patients diagnosed with autoimmune sensorineural hearing loss had Meniere's syndrome. [14] Brookes identified elevated immune complexes in 54% of patients with Meniere's disease, compared with only 2.9% of controls.