minuet

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minuet

(mĭnyo͞oĕt`), French dance, originally from Poitou, introduced at the court of Louis XIV in 1650. It became popular during the 17th and 18th cent. In 3–4 meter and moderate tempo, the minuet was performed by open couples who made graceful and precise glides and steps. The minuet left a refined but definite imprint on music; it is found in the operatic sinfonias of Alessandro Scarlatti and appears frequently as a movement in the symphonies and sonatas of Haydn and Mozart.

Minuet

 

a French dance, which developed from a folk dance from the province of Poitou. The minuet became a courtly dance in the second half of the 17th century and then spread throughout Europe as a ballroom dance (in Russia, it was introduced by Peter I). It is marked by smooth, majestic movements, consisting primarily of bows and curtsies. The dance is in 3/4 time. In the 18th century the minuet acquired variations: the tempo was quickened, movements became more complicated, and the dance took on affected features.

Early examples of minuets appear in J. B. Lully’s ballets for operas, F. Couperin’s clavier music, G. F. Handel’s overtures to oratorios, and Handel’s and J. S. Bach’s orchestral and instrumental suites. Mozart gave the minuet exuberance and vitality. Gradually it was transformed into the scherzo (for example, in works by Beethoven). The minuet is rarely encountered in works from the late 19th century and early 20th (Debussy, Ravel, Fauré, Tchaikovsky, Prokofiev).

S. P. PANKRATOV

minuet

1. a stately court dance of the 17th and 18th centuries in triple time
2. a piece of music composed for or in the rhythm of this dance, sometimes as a movement in a suite, sonata, or symphony

Minuet

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References in periodicals archive ?
The "C" theme in the subdominant key (the menuetto is in true rondo form) incorporates the neighbor-tone motive in a fashion similar to that of the lyrical theme of the rondo of the first sonata but with a change in metrical inflection (3/4 instead of 6/8).
For a work with such a pronounced pastoral tone and modest manners, Menuetto is surprisingly controversial.
Hard edges in the first Menuetto were a disappointment, but a jolly theme and variation movement somehow took us to the country with lovely summer sounds.
For instance, with reference to the arrangement of the Menuetto I/11 from Brahms's Serenade No.
This is the case, for instance, with the Menuetto of the String Quartet in D, K575.
He began with the Haffner Symphony, lively, springy, with a fruity bass sound, breathtaking string articulation in the andante, and with an idiomatic Viennese lilt and rubato in the Menuetto's Trio.
Neumann again oversimplifies matters when he uniformly equates Tempo di Menuetto with Allegretto, or his conception of it, which he claims to mean |relaxed ease' and to have been 'anything but fast.' Allegretto for Czerny (and, arguably, Haydn) seems subject to no such restrictions.
Some editorial comment was called for here, as indeed it is in the case of the final movement, a rondo that alternates Allegretto [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] sections with a Menuetto in [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]: Gabler might have suggested a likely tempo relationship between the two types of material.
The menuetto's rise out of the Largo's stricken close was beautifully managed, as was the opening of the finale, with its hesitant first idea, but as soon as the argument picked up we were off again on a headlong dash that denied any opportunity for reflection.
(46) Two other instances involve the violinist snapping the last pizzicato note and saying "ouch" at the end of the second movement, "Menuetto con brio ma senza trio," and the performers yelling "hey" rhythmically during quick rests in the concluding "Presto hey nonny nonnio" movement.
It was also a well-considered interpretation packed with satisfying contrast (between a stately opening Largo and especially brisk second movement, for example), conveying refinement without sacrificing colour - the bright second Menuetto and exuberant final Rondo were memorably well-judged.