Mercator projection


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Related to Mercator projection: Transverse Mercator projection

Mercator projection

an orthomorphic map projection on which parallels and meridians form a rectangular grid, scale being exaggerated with increasing distance from the equator

Mercator Projection

 

one of the cartographic projections. The Mercator projection is equiangular and cylindrical. In this projection all the loxodromes—lines on a sphere intersecting all meridians at the same angle—are represented as straight lines inclined at the same angle to the meridians. The projection is widely used in making marine and aeronautical charts, and it is also often used in oblique orientation. The projection was developed and first employed by G. Mercator in 1569.

Mercator projection

[mər′kād·ər prə‚jek·shən]
(mapping)
A conformal cylindrical map projection in which the surface of a sphere or spheroid, such as the earth, is conceived as developed on a cylinder tangent along the Equator; meridians appear as equally spaced vertical lines, and parallels as horizontal lines drawn farther apart as the latitude increases, such that the correct relationship between latitude and longitude scales at any point is maintained.
References in periodicals archive ?
the Mercator Projection map in classrooms with the more accurate Peters
Groud Control Using Space Oblique Mercator Projection Theory." Cartography and Geographic Information Science 37 (4): 261-272.
When symbol users examine a cylindrical Mercator projection of the Earth and no other map, if they are ignorant of what a Mercator projection does to the Earth, they will distort the countries of the earth with respect to size.
For a Mercator projection, the expression of its map factor m in spherical coordinates is:
Although many geographers no longer recommend using the Mercator projection, it was the basis for the system developed by the U.S.
These maps show a Mercator projection of the Earth, so to pinpoint the location of a hurricane, students will need its absolute location (longitude and latitude) as provided in National Weather Service announcements.
Sowell points out, correctly, that the Mercator projection has long proven useful for navigation and other purposes and that alternative types of maps distort the globe in different ways.
Since, on the sphere, the meridians of longitude approach each other and meet at the poles, this means that in a Mercator projection, the east-west distances are increasingly exaggerated as one travels north or south from the equator.
For states with a shape greater in the North-South direction, the transverse Mercator projection was developed.
A transverse Mercator projection was consequently adopted for recording borehole collar positions.
The Mercator projection, named for the Dutch cartographer who devised it, distorts the size of Alaska so that it appears nearly as large as Brazil, which is actually five times the size of our 49th State.
We meet strip maps, the Mappa Mundi, the Mercator projection (and navigational charts based thereon), John Snow's map of cholera in London, treasure maps, maps of Antarctic expeditions, city street directories, transportation system maps such as Harry Beck's London Tube map, maps in movies, video games and travel guides, and more ephemeral maps, such as those that exist in in-car navigation systems or taxi drivers' brains.