Mercurialis


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to Mercurialis: Mercurialis perennis, Mercurialis annua

Mercurialis

 

(mercury), a genus of perennial and annual herbs of the family Euphorbiaceae. The leaves are opposite, and the flowers are unisexual, small, and greenish. The plants are usually dioecious. The staminate flowers are in clusters, and the pistillate flowers are generally solitary. The perianth is simple and three-parted. The fruit is a schizocarp with two one-seeded cells. There are eight species, distributed in Eurasia (mainly in the Mediterranean region). In the USSR three species are encountered in the European part and in the Caucasus. Dog’s mercury (M. perennis) grows in shady, mainly broad-leaved forests and thickets; it blossoms in early spring. The leaves contain a dark blue dye. All species of mercury are poisonous.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Sur cette question les travaux en langue anglaise de Pamela Smith The body of Artisan: Art and experience in the scientific revolution (2004), permettent de mieux comprendre la question de la denomination du De Arte Gymnastica Mercurialis et le fond qui structure cette denomination.
Also to be found in the manuscript collection are lectures by Hieronymus Mercurialis and Hieronymus Capivacceus as taken down by their pupils, probably in Padua, during the sixteenth century.
(29) NUTTON, Vivian: <<Les exercices et la sante: Hieronymus Mercurialis et la gymnastique medicale>>, en CEARD, Jean; FONTAINE, Marie Madeleine y MARGOLIN, Jean-Claude (eds.): Le Corps a la Renaissance.
"Les exerciccs et la same: Hieronymus Mercurialis et la gymnasrique medicale." In Le corps a la Renaissance, ed.
The work covers the specific issue of hygiene addressed by Mercurialis (1569) in De arte gymnastica.
Although references to the Olympic games and Olympia appear frequently in Byzantine literature, ostensibly for the first time in the work of the Florentine poet and statesman Mateo Palmieri and subsequently in the work of European humanists, including Virgilius Polydorus and Hieronymus Mercurialis, the games are first mentioned in western European literature in the work of French dramatist Robert Garnier, specifically in his tragedy, Cornelie.
Different guises find varied voices here, from the complex stanzas of Halsey's anagrammatic alter ego Ashley Hayles, whose "superstitions included a fear of waste paper," to the sparkling translations of the elusive third-century poet Mercurialis the Younger, a high comic satirist with a particularly acerbic edge.
The understory is rich and formed mainly by Allium ursinum L., Mercurialis perennis L., Anemone nemorosa L., and Melica uniflora Retz.
The ruderal Mercurialis annua is another dioecious species in which self-compatible bisexuality (monoecy) has evolved in regions where selection for reproductive assurance is highest (Pannell 1997a).
"Communication Disorder in Renaissance Italy: An Unreported Case Analysis by Hieronymus Mercurialis (1530-1606)." Journal of Communication Disorders 23 (1990): 14.
Historical factors affecting the distribution of Mercurialis perennis in central Lincolnshire.