meridian

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Meridian

(mərĭd`ēən), city (1990 pop. 41,036), seat of Lauderdale co., E Miss., near the Ala. line; settled 1831, inc. 1860. It is an important rail and highway point and the trade and shipping center for a farm, livestock, and timber area. There is also diverse manufacturing. In the Civil War, Meridian was the temporary capital of Mississippi (1863); it was destroyed by General Sherman in Feb., 1864. Meridian Naval Air Station is to the north. Nearby Okatibbee Reservoir offers recreational activities.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

meridian

(mĕ-rid -ee-ăn)
1. An imaginary great circle passing through a point on the surface of a body, such as a planet or satellite, at right angles to the equator and passing through the north and south poles.
2. Short for celestial meridian. The projection of the observer's terrestrial meridian on the celestial sphere. It is thus the great circle passing through the north and south celestial poles and the observer's zenith and intersecting the observer's horizon at the north and south points (see cardinal points).
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

Meridian

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

A meridian (from the Latin word for “midday”) is formed by taking a line of longitude and projecting it outward from Earth onto the celestial sphere. Another way of imagining a meridian is to picture the circle that would be formed by drawing a line connecting the north pole, the zenith (the point in the sky directly overhead), the south pole, and the nadir (the point directly opposite the zenith).

The Astrology Book, Second Edition © 2003 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

meridian

[mə′rid·ē·ən]
(astronomy)
A great circle passing through the poles of the axis of rotation of a planet or satellite.
(geodesy)
A north-south reference line, particularly a great circle through the geographical poles of the earth.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

meridian

meridian
A semi—great circle joining the geographical poles. All meridians indicate a north-south direction. Every great circle joining the poles forms a meridian and its antimeridian.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

meridian

1. 
a. one of the imaginary lines joining the north and south poles at right angles to the equator, designated by degrees of longitude from 0? at Greenwich to 180?
b. the great circle running through both poles
2. Astronomy
a. the great circle on the celestial sphere passing through the north and south celestial poles and the zenith and nadir of the observer
b. (as modifier): a meridian instrument
3. Maths a section of a surface of revolution, such as a paraboloid, that contains the axis of revolution
4. (in acupuncture, etc.) any of the channels through which vital energy is believed to circulate round the body
5. Obsolete noon
6. along or relating to a meridian
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
It remained this way until the reigns of Charles II of England and Louis XIV of France, each of whom wanted the privilege of having the prime meridian cross his kingdom.
To this day, however, all maps issued by France's National Geographic Institute not only show longitudes based on Greenwich and other modern systems, but also complementary grids based on the Paris meridian and expressed in grades (400 grades in a circle)--a heritage from the French Revolution!
As with shiatsu, pressure is key, but here the therapist uses the thumb, fingers, and elbow on two points only (shiatsu uses the whole meridian line), temporarily reducing blood flow to the area.
The issue yet to be resolved is firstly, whether different electrical properties exist between meridians and non-meridians and secondly, whether this difference can enhance the understanding of how acupuncture can be used to treat disease or assist patients with pain relief.
Its objective was to consider the complex electron interactions in biological elements along meridians that show electrical properties, and to illustrate how these might differ from non-meridians.
A firm grounding in regular meridian systems is needed to fully appreciate this shiatsu book.
The following six chapters are devoted to diagnosing and treating imbalances within the different meridian systems.
*The body's 360+ acu-points act as emergency call boxes along our energy meridians. Specific points can be stimulated to bring the energy meridians back to balance, helping us to re-align our emotional and physical energies.
A variety of tools can be used to strengthen the body's energy meridians. Healers past and present have used pressure, magnets, heat, light, electricity, suction, and, of course, needles.
Over the last two years, Meridian Capital has negotiated in excess of $5 Billion in commercial financing.