Meriwether Lewis


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Lewis, Meriwether,

1774–1809, American explorer, one of the leaders of the Lewis and Clark expeditionLewis and Clark expedition,
1803–6, U.S. expedition that explored the territory of the Louisiana Purchase and the country beyond as far as the Pacific Ocean. Purpose
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, b. near Charlottesville, Va. He was a captain in the army and served in a number of campaigns against Native Americans before becoming (1801) secretary to his friend President Jefferson. Selected to head the expedition for a land route to the Pacific Ocean, he chose William ClarkClark, William,
1770–1838, American explorer, one of the leaders of the Lewis and Clark expedition, b. Caroline co., Va.; brother of George Rogers Clark. He was an army officer (1792–96), serving in a number of engagements with Native Americans.
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 as his associate. Upon that successful venture Lewis's fame rests. In 1807 he was made governor of Louisiana Territory, with headquarters at St. Louis. In 1809, while traveling to Washington to prepare the journals of the expedition for publication, he died suddenly—either by murder or suicide—in a lonely inn on the Natchez Trace. The cause of his death is still the subject of controversy.

Bibliography

See biography by R. H. Dillon (1968); see also bibliography under Lewis and Clark expeditionLewis and Clark expedition,
1803–6, U.S. expedition that explored the territory of the Louisiana Purchase and the country beyond as far as the Pacific Ocean. Purpose
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Lewis, Meriwether

(1774–1809) explorer, soldier; born in Albemarle County, Va. He became President Thomas Jefferson's private secretary (1801) and was chosen, with William Clark, to lead an overland expedition to the Pacific Ocean. He and Clark made careful observations of the wildlife and lands that they passed through on their journey (1804–06). Lewis was governor of the Louisiana Territory (1806–09) and died mysteriously while on his way to Washington, D.C., in 1809.
References in periodicals archive ?
In October 1803, Meriwether Lewis traveled down the Ohio River recruiting men for his Corps of Discovery, which was about to strike out on its fabled journey across the continent to map and explore.
On their epic journey across the West, from 1804-1806, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark kept detailed notes on the flora and fauna they discovered during their adventures.
What once was a large patch of grass outside the Meriwether Lewis Elementary School in Portland, Oregon, has grown into the Lewis Learning Gardens--a dream come true for members of the school community.
"The Death of Meriwether Lewis: A Historic Crime Scene Investigation" discusses the death of one of the key figures in America's expansion westward.
Llyfr o straeon ydi o am Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, tua 30 o ddynion eraill, un ferch a babi deithiodd i fyny'r Missouri.
The tradition of nature and travel writing initiated by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark in their Journals (1814) comes to bear on the meticulous detailing of wilderness living in Henry David Thoreau's Walden (1854), as well as the acute observations of Mark Twain's legendary narrator in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885).
(7)) but also the self-destruction of Meriwether Lewis (8), commander of the Lewis and Clarke expedition, the Corps of Discovery.
One of the most precious documents in American history happens to be a letter written by President Thomas Jefferson to a 29-year-old gentleman named Meriwether Lewis. In this letter, composed on June 20, 1803, Jefferson laid out a blueprint for the expedition he wanted Lewis to lead.
PART OF THE WESTERN TERRITORY EXPLORED IN THE early 1800s by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, Portland, Oregon, is still a region where the adventurous can forge new trails, says native Bill Mitchell.
Thomas Jefferson and Meriwether Lewis, along with a secret society, are involved.
Perelman, Thomas Jefferson, Gertrude Stein, Nathaniel Hawthorne, explorer Meriwether Lewis, and even McDonald's founder Ray Kroc.
Meriwether Lewis and William Clark returned to the St.