Merkle tree

Merkle tree

A hashed summary of transactions stored in the header of a block in a blockchain distributed ledger. Transaction data are recursively hashed twice using the SHA256 cryptographic algorithm until there is only one hash value remaining, known as the "Merkle root." The root is very small in size and can be quickly processed to determine if a transaction resides within the block. For example, 16 transactions in a block produce a 128-byte Merkle path, but 65,535 transactions take up only 512 bytes. See blockchain.


Blockchain Headers
The Merkle root is stored in the headers of the blocks in the blockchain.
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References in periodicals archive ?
EON blockchain was "scaled down" due to the Merkle tree implementation;
Finally, the Merkle tree is built logically for protecting data integrity.
In the SWHash scheme, the memory is partitioned into chunks and a l-level Merkle tree is built up for integrity verification.
Hash trees also named Merkle trees were proposed in [7] as a protocol to authenticate data integrity efficiently.
Merkle trees are widely used in storage and memory integrity protection.
In cryptography, Merkle tree considers a binary tree which consists of many nodes; each non-leaf node is imprinted with the hash of the names of its child nodes.
Merkle Tree We use a Merkle Tree to maintain all the stored data file.
a Merkle Tree, as in [3,5] to maintain the authentication structure.
Then Ugenerates a root R based on the construction of a Merkle Tree, where the leave nodes represents an ordered set of hashes of "file tags", i.