Merodach-baladan

Merodach-baladan

(mĕr`ōdăk-băl`ədăn), fl. 722–702 B.C., Chaldaean prince, who usurped (721) the Babylonian throne. Sargon of Assyria put down the allies of Merodach-baladan in Syria and Palestine and eventually drove (c.710) the usurper from Babylon. After Sargon's death, Merodach-baladan reoccupied (703–702) the throne. During his rule of Babylonia, he strengthened the Chaldaean Empire. He is also called Baladan and Berodach-baladan.
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Using the evidence from the letters, Luukko successfully discusses the careers of many significant officials, including Asipa (governor of Tushan), Assur-belu-taqqin (an official in Babylonia), Assur-dainanni (governor of Mazamua), Assur-lei (an official active on the Urartian border), Assur-sallimanni (governor of Arrapha), Assur-simanni (governor of Kilizi), Balassu (leader of Bit-Dakkuri), Bel-aplu-iddina (an official in central Assyria), Bel-duri (governor of Damascus), Inurta-belu-usur (governor of Arpad), Inurta-ilai (governor of Nasibina), Merodach-baladan (chieftain of Bit-Yakin), Mukin-zeri (leader of Bit-Amukani), Nadinu (leader of Larak), Qurdi-Assur-lamur (governor of Simirra), a rab-saqe, a turtanu, and Ululayu (the crown prince).
There is, nevertheless, a reference in the Bible to Hezekiah's ties with the Babylonian king, Merodach-Baladan, for which Isaiah the prophet rebuked him (II Kgs.
59-65) to describe the flight of Merodach-Baladan, and in Sargon's (Fuchs, Die Inschriften Sargons II, 114, 11.
that is, to the events of the campaign to unseat Merodach-Baladan and bring Babylonia under Assyrian control.
55-57) are reports on the whereabouts of Merodach-Baladan. One of them (no.
Dietrich considers that these reports refer to the renewed political activity of Merodach-Baladan after the death of Sargon in 705 and that they reflect alarm on the part of the commanders.
92) by Marduk-apal-iddina I and II, the latter the biblical Merodach-Baladan (sic); the meaningless reading Lamgi-Mari seems to be preferred to the now generally accepted Ishqi-Mari.
As seen from an inscription of Merodach-Baladan II composed at the end of the eighth century, Istar bore the title Lady-of-Uruk, while Nanaya was considered Queen of Uruk.
Nabu-zer-kitti-lisir, governor of the Sealand and a son of Merodach-baladan, had attacked Ur without success in 680 and then fled to Elam seeking refuge.