Merope


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Merope

(mĕr`əpē), in Greek mythology. 1 One of the Pleiades. She was the wife of Sisyphus, king of Corinth, and the mother of Glaucus. According to one legend she became the lost Pleiad because of the shame she felt for having married a mortal. 2 Daughter of Oenopion. Orion loved her, but when he failed to gain her father's approval, he raped her. In revenge, Oenopion blinded him.

Merope

(me -roh-pee) See Pleiades.
References in periodicals archive ?
Written as ordered pairs (x, y) according to Table 3, the coordinates are as follows: Atlas (0, 7); Alcyone (9, 7); Merope (16, 6); Maia (30, 9); Taygeta (35, 9); Electra (63, 5); and Celaeno (72, 9).
The disjunct distributions of the two extant members of Meropeidae in eastern North America and western Australia (Kaltenbach 1978; Byers 2005), and the extinct meropeid Boreomerope antiqua Novokschonov from Middle Jurassic of Siberia (Novokschonov 1995, 1998), suggests that as far back as the Jurassic ancestral Meropeidae may have been widespread, and that Merope and its Australian confamiliar Austromerope poultoni Killington are relict survivors on opposite ends of the former familial range (Killington 1933; Byers 1988).
Du cote de la haute culture Claudio Manoel da Costa est l'auteur du Parnasse Obsequieux, drame a reciter accompagne de musique et represente en 1768 et Inacio Jose de Alvarenga Peixoto est l'auteur du drame Enee au Latium et le traducteur de Merope de Scipio Maffey.
Thus painstaking scholarship traces the origins of The Castle of Otranto to two decisive innovations: the practice of "psycho-narration," a third-person entrance into the thoughts and feelings of all the major characters; and a displacement into narrative of the supernatural flourishes and oedipal rivalries already domesticated by melodramas such as John Home's Douglas and Aaron Hill's Merope.
She hears readings of Merope and La Pucelle, and the amateur dramatics begin as soon as the company is numerous enough to put a cast together.
Voltaire's Merope, considered by some "one of the most perfect tragedies" (102), is a pale copy of the Italian version by Maffei (itself a subversive copy of the extinct original by Euripides), from which Voltaire borrowed "fable, plan and manner" (104) as well as the plot and the denouement (157).
Sis, Merope Rhonda Coullet Asterope, Peggy Ann, et al.
36) Scholars tend to correct Aelian and substitute the name of Merope, since she is the wife of Kresphontes, while Aerope is the wife of Atreus; see Ghiron-Bistagne 157.
While fleeing Polybus and Merope and the oracle he believes will destroy them, Oedipus kills King Laius, marries the now widowed queen, and takes over the throne of Thebes.
In the next scene, Oedipus is seen sleepwalking, dreaming that the Jocasta he approaches in bed is his supposed mother, Merope, and that he has killed his supposed father, Polybus, two acts whose criminality he clearly ranks:
Eager to enable her husband to obtain a male offspring and future heir to his estates and riches, Merope accepts Philippas's aggressive plan to pay the healthy and attractive daughter of his destitute worker Panayis to become a surrogate mother of a child sired by him.