Merry Wives of Windsor, The

Merry Wives of Windsor, The

Mr. Ford disguises himself in order to thwart Falstaff’s designs on Mrs. Ford. [Br. Drama: Shakespeare The Merry Wives of Windsor]
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Simeon Truby as Mr Erlanson and Giles Corey (The Red Balloon (Birmingham Rep), Warhorse - International Tour (National Theatre), Sweeney Todd (Aldephi Theatre), Merry Wives of Windsor, The Mouse and His Child (RSC)), Freddy Elletson as Frid and Revd John Hale (Holby City (BBC), Wonder Woman (Warner Brothers)), Richard Lounds as Henrik and Marshal Herrick (L'Etoile du Nord, Kokkola Opera; The House of Usher at The Hope Theatre)), Mary Doherty as Charlotte Malcolm and Elizabeth Proctor (Twelfth Night (National Theatre); Henry VI Trilogy (Shakespeare's Globe), Anne Boleyn (ETT and Shakespeare's Globe), All's Well That Ends Well - Shakespeare's Globe)).
(111.) Giorgio Melchiori, ed., The Merry Wives of Windsor, The Arden Shakespeare: Third Series (Walton-on-Thames, Surrey: Thomas Nelson and Sons Ltd., 2000), 49-52.
Grav (whose academic credentials are not supplied) writes five chapters focusing on The Comedy of Errors, The Merry Wives of Windsor, The Merchant of Venice, Measure for Measure, and Timon of Athens, with particular attention in the last chapter in reconciling the Timons of Shakespeare and Middleton.
Music includes selections from The Merry Wives of Windsor, the Magic of Lloyd Webber and Gilbert and Sullivan.
In seven chapters, she comments on Comedy of Errors, A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merry Wives of Windsor, the English histories and Hamlet, All's Well that Ends Well and TroiIus and Cressida, and Othello and Hamlet.
Showing that New Bibliographers were never the cool-headed scientists they might have believed themselves to be, Leah Marcus charts the critical assumptions underlying their editing in five essays that examine the early editions of Marlowe's Doctor Faustus, Shakespeare's The Merry Wives of Windsor, The Taming of A/The Shrew, and Hamlet, and Milton's Poems.
No one, as far as I know, has ventured a Titus Andronicus or even a Henry V, but I have personally seen ballets based on Romeo and Juliet, A Midsummer Night's Dream (these two are the all-time favorites for Bardic ballet), Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, The Taming of the Shrew, The Merry Wives of Windsor, The Tempest, Twelfth Night, Antony and Cleopatra, and even a ballet--Kenneth MacMillan's Aspects of Love--based on the Sonnets.
Merry Wives of Windsor, The Comedy in five acts by William SHAKESPEARE, produced about 1600-01 and published in a quarto edition in 1602.