Merton


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Related to Merton: Robert Merton, Thomas Merton

Merton,

outer borough (1991 pop. 161,800) of Greater London, SE England. The area is largely residential with some industry, including tanning and the manufacture of silk and calico prints, varnish and paint, and toys. An annual fair dating from Elizabethan times is held within the borough at Mitcham, and one of the largest mosques in Europe is in Morden. Merton also contains Wimbledon, England's tennis headquarters; the first Wimbledon Championship match took place in 1877. Cricket and golf matches are also played. George EliotEliot, George,
pseud. of Mary Ann or Marian Evans,
1819–80, English novelist, b. Arbury, Warwickshire.
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 lived in Wimbledon. Merton has remains of a priory that was founded in 1115 and destroyed by Thomas CromwellCromwell, Thomas, earl of Essex,
1485?–1540, English statesman. While a young man he lived abroad as a soldier, accountant, and merchant, and on his return (c.1512) to England he engaged in the wool trade and eventually became a lawyer.
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. Walter de MertonMerton, Walter de,
d. 1277, English bishop, founder of Merton College, Oxford. He was lord chancellor from 1261 to 1263, was reappointed after the death of Henry III (1272), and was made bishop of Rochester in 1274.
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, Lord High Chancellor to Henry III and founder of Merton College, Oxford, and Thomas à BecketThomas à Becket, Saint,
or Saint Thomas Becket,
1118–70, English martyr, archbishop of Canterbury, b. London. He is called St. Thomas of Canterbury and occasionally St. Thomas of London.
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 were educated at the priory. Admiral Horatio NelsonNelson, Horatio Nelson, Viscount,
1758–1805, British admiral. The most famous of Britain's naval heroes, he is commemorated by the celebrated Nelson Column in Trafalgar Square, London.
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 and Lady Emma HamiltonHamilton, Emma, Lady,
1765?–1815, mistress of the British naval hero Horatio Nelson. Born Emma Lyon, she became the mistress of Charles Greville, then of Sir William Hamilton, ambassador to Naples, whom she married (1791).
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 lived together in Merton Park.

Merton

1
Thomas (Feverel). 1915--68, US writer, monk, and mystic; noted esp for his autobiography The Seven Storey Mountain (1948)

Merton

2
a borough in SW Greater London. Pop.: 191 400 (2003 est.). Area: 38 sq. km (15 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
Robert Ellsberg, publisher of Orbis Books, reminded the audience that both Merton and Nouwen were constantly restless spiritual explorers.
SAFE transformed the Little Merton into a pop-up pub last year, using the former local as an event space.
It seems Merton have decided our proposal is of such little importance that it does not even warrant informing the Mayor as a material consideration when he decides if he should simply pass the planning decision back to Merton or determine it himself.
She met Cash and fellow Royle Family collaborator Henry Normal in 1990 and they encouraged her to develop her repertoire of comedy characters, including Mrs Merton.
Books by Merton are in the dozens, published while he was alive and after his death, but those about him are just as many.
I share that distinction below because I think it is a helpful way to access his thought, and it will become a lens through which we will view his later reflections on Merton, particularly Merton's considerations of the tractor, a commodity that exemplifies for both Merton and Borgmann the subtle insinuations of instrumental reason replacing contemplative existence.
He is artistic director of Improbable and, along with Richard Vranch, he wrote and performed on Paul Merton - The Tour and Paul Merton - The Palladium.
Catholics will appreciate the distinction of religious sects and appreciate Horan's surprise in finding Franciscan roots in Merton's writing; other religious people will simply savor the holy truths Merton lived out.
When Merton writes, it is as if he speaks--his voice at once tender and stern, intimate and abiding, reassuring and intimidating.
In the life of Thomas Merton, contemplation at first was a definite goal, but gradually lost its sharpness, though not its force, whereas technology was at first an implicit and unspoken presence that toward the end of Merton's life assumed definite and troubling contours.
Almost thirty years ago, in "How Waugh Cut Merton," [1] I dealt with Evelyn Waugh's editing of Thomas Merton's The Seven Storey Mountain for the English edition and quoted some of his comments on Merton's need to consider economy and directness in his style.
Merton lived most of his life in a monastery and was eventually to live a solitary life as a hermit in a hut in the surrounding woods.