Meshcherskii

Meshcherskii

 

an urban-type settlement subordinate to the Gagarin District Soviet, Moscow. The settlement has a railroad station at Vostriakovo. There is a house-building combine in the settlement.

References in periodicals archive ?
Rozhnov, V.V., Pishchulina, S.L., Meshcherskii, I.G., Simakin, L.V., Lazebnyi, O.E.
(28) For example, Katkov and Meshcherskii argued that Nikolai Khristianovich Bunge's economic policies verged on socialism and undermined the welfare of the landowners, whom the editors considered the pillars of autocracy.
After the tsar officially confirmed his new appointment in March 1889, Witte paid his first social visit to Meshcherskii's Wednesday salon, where Vyshnegradskii introduced him to the highest echelons of the Russian bureaucracy.
While Witte and Vyshnegradskii used Moskovskie vedomosti in their struggle against Transportation Minister Giubbenet, Meshcherskii's support resulted in Giubbenet's dismissal in January 1892 and Witte's promotion to the vacant post a month later.
In his memoirs, however, Witte distanced himself from Meshcherskii: "[He] persistently sought to befriend me, but I tried to get away from it." (43) Meshcherskii's alleged homosexuality may have been responsible for this.
Frank deals here with Dostoevskii's fifteen-month editorship, in 1873-74, of the magazine Grazhdanin (The Citizen), owned by the powerful and rather louche Prince Meshcherskii. He describes the history of the composition of A Raw Youth and then discusses that novel, whose relative weakness he partly attributes to the limitations that Dostoevskii imposed upon himself by his agreement to publish it in the journal Notes of the Fatherland (which by 1875, when the novel appeared, had taken on a Populist hue).
Kasimov, centered on the Russian fortress of Meshcherskii gorodok and located on the Oka River east of Riazan', was only one of several southeastern border towns routinely used by Muscovite rulers to lure Juchid princes into their service.
Meshcherskii, the editor of the newspaper Grazhdanin who had developed close ties to Nicholas II, proposed using the phrase "freedom of word and conscience" in the first draft of a manifesto that was eventually published in 1903.
Since 1902, Meshcherskii had been developing the theme of harmony between freedom and autocracy in the pages of his newspaper.
His reputation suffered from rumors about his relationship with the notorious Vladimir Petrovich Meshcherskii, the editor of the government-subsidized journal Grazhdanin, and because of his unscrupulous collaboration under various pennames with a number of newspapers of often conflicting political orientations.25 He had many contacts in the bureaucratic world, and at different stages of his career he was close to S.
Mary Cavender writes that the women of the Meshcherskii family continued to compose letters in French in the mid-19th century, whereas men were more likely to use Russian.
Sharapov called for the decentralization of the government, Vladimir Petrovich Meshcherskii and Klavdii Nikandrovich Paskhalov advocated restrictions on the Dumas prerogatives, the restoration of the old State Council, and the expansion of the emperor's right to legislate without Duma participation (using the notorious article 87 of the Fundamental Laws).