Mesolithic era

Mesolithic era

The cultural period between the Paleolithic and Neolithic eras, marked by the appearance of cutting tools.
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1.5 to 2degC per century, hunter-gatherers in Europe during the Mesolithic era (approximately 11,000-6,000 years ago) experienced significant environmental changes, very similar to the ones we face today: rising sea levels, increased drought, plant and animal migrations, and wildfires.
Other discoveries made along the 27km stretch of road construction and reported in the book include evidence for hunter gatherers from the Mesolithic era (before 4000 BC), as well as traces of land clearance and settlement left by early Neolithic farmers (4000-2400 BC), along with the site of a possible Bronze Age 'sauna' (referred to as a 'burnt mound'): a flattened mound of charcoal and burnt stone, thought to be the evidence for heating stones to high temperatures to boil water for cooking or to create steam for a kind of sauna.
| Goldcliff, Newport Back in the Mesolithic era, the area in and around Goldcliff would have looked quite different.
The ochre stick from the Mesolithic era is thought to have been used for applying colour to animal skins as well as making art.
Mr Jacques said the area is the longest continuously occupied in Britain in prehistoric times indicating that the site was of paramount importance in the Mesolithic era.
In the mesolithic era, which seems to have been about 10,000 years ago, there were people living on the hill.
Uncovering evidence of settlement from the Mesolithic era (9600-4100 BCE) through the Medieval period (15th century CE) and even residual items dating to 36,000 BCE , the volume documents in detail a rich collection of artifacts and sites.
He added that "there is evidence to suggest it came from the Mesolithic era.
During the new motorway's construction, archaeologists uncovered an Iron Age settlement, a Roman burial ground and more than 1,000 pieces of flint from the Mesolithic era. They are all set to go on display at local museums.
The piece has now been identified as coming from the Mesolithic era and is believed to have been used as a type of sharp weapon, possibly for spearing fish.