mesoscale

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mesoscale

A scale used in meteorology that extends from approximately 0.7 to 70 miles (1 to 100 km). Mesoscale features include such things as thunderstorms, sea breezes, gust fronts, and macrobursts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kanak in Atmospheric Turbulence and Mesoscale Meteorology, edited byE.
Lappin is majoring in meteorology at Florida State University where she is focusing her studies on mesoscale meteorology and modeling.
The scientific community, his family, and his friends have lost one of the founders of mesoscale meteorology, as well as a man with a bright creative mind, a shy smile, and a humorous and friendly personality.
Lis is majoring in meteorology at the Pennsylvania State University where he is focusing his studies on mesoscale meteorology, more specifically severe weather research.
Orehek is majoring in meteorology at Millersville University where she is focusing her studies on severe weather, mesoscale meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, disaster preparedness, education, and field research.
Major focal points include atmospheric chemistry; radiation and remote sensing; climate and atmosphere-ocean dynamics; cloud microphysics, severe storms, and mesoscale meteorology; and global biogeochemical cycles and ecosystems.
Fred's research interests include synoptic, tropical, and mesoscale meteorology, numerical weather prediction, new observing systems, and data assimilation.
forecasters on the application of new technologies (such as Doppler radar) to mesoscale meteorology problems into a program with a much broader scope.
Britt is majoring in meteorology at Ohio University where she is focusing her studies on severe weather/tornado research: mesoscale meteorology.
Biernat is interested in synoptic and mesoscale meteorology; and during graduate school will study these areas including tropical meteorology.
Handler is majoring in meteorology at Plymouth State University where he is focusing his studies on synoptic and mesoscale meteorology.
Daniel Keyser, for his meticulously crafted and inspiring lectures, his individualized mentoring and unwavering commitment to students, and his landmark contributions to synoptic and mesoscale meteorology education.