Messier's catalog

Messier's catalog

[me′syāz ′kad·əl‚äg]
(astronomy)
A listing of 103 star clusters and nebulae compiled in 1784.
References in periodicals archive ?
This isn't the only cosmic object from Messier's catalog that Hubble has taken images of, however, as the NASA/ESA telescope had observed 96 of the 110 objects by June 2018.
At a distance of 13,000 light-years, it's the third-nearest globular cluster in Charles Messier's catalog, topped only by M4 in Scorpius at 7,200 light-years and M22 in Sagittarius at 10,000 light-years.
A seemingly detached portion of the Orion Nebula, barely north, carries its own entry in Messier's catalog as M43.
Leo itself harbors 809 galaxies from the New General Catalogue (NGC), five of them previously listed in Charles Messier's catalog. For this foray into the night sky, we're going to turn our gaze toward three of those bearing Messier designations and assorted NGC escorts.
It's the only supernova remnant in Charles Messier's catalog. In 1054 A.D., Chinese astronomers gazing toward the sky saw an object so bright that it was even visible during daylight.
Observers are expected to star-hop to any 70 of the objects from Charles Messier's catalog to earn a certificate.
A seemingly detached portion of the Orion Nebula carries its own entry in Messier's catalog as M43.
But more interesting than the designations they have is the one they lack--neither cluster made it into Charles Messier's catalog. It seems certain that Messier knew about the pair, but perhaps he didn't include them because he simply couldn't imagine anyone mistaking them for a comet.
This enormous spiral galaxy is called Messier 31, or M31--the 31st object in 18th-century French astronomer Charles Messier's catalog of nonstellar objects.
At a distance of 13,000 light-years, M71 is the third nearest globular cluster included in Charles Messier's catalog. It's topped only by M4 in Scorpius at 7,200 light-years and M22 in Sagittarius at 10,000 light-years.
The Orion Nebula is also known as M42--the 42nd entry in Charles Messier's catalog of objects.
M63, another offering from Messier's catalog, is perched 1.2[degrees] north of the 6th-magnitude star 19 Canum Venaticorum.