mestizo

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Related to Mestiso: criollo

mestizo

(māstē`sō) [Span.,=mixture], person of mixed race; particularly, in Mexico and Central and South America, a person of European (Spanish or Portuguese) and indigenous descent. The mestizos constitute a large part of the population in several Latin American countries; they are in various places also called by other names, e.g., ladinos in Guatemala, caboclos in Brazil. The word is primarily applied to a mixture of racial strains, but it has acquired social and cultural connotations; it may be applied to pure-blooded indigenous people who adopt European dress and customs. All persons of mixed race are called mestizos in the Philippines.
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References in periodicals archive ?
[Al margen izquierdo: "Bentura con Magdalena desposados y velados"] "[Cartago] En treinta de nobiembre de mil seiscientos y sesenta i nuebe anos, despose y vele segun horden de nuestra Santa Madre Iglessia a bentura de Coto mestiso natural desta ciudad abiendo corrido las tres amonestaciones con que dispone el Santo Concilio de Trento con Maria Magdalena mulata natural desta 9iudad.
Also called Mestiso 59, it has a potential yield of 12 tons per hectare.
I will deal later with the wider epistemological consequences of this concern with 'mixtures', but in terms of human taxonomy such was the English awareness of hybridization that by the mid-seventeenth century English readers had already been familiarized with many of the 'new' human types fashioned by the Spaniards in the New World, as Thomas Gage described in his New Survey of the West-Indies (1648), a travel narrative (the first ever by a non-Spaniard in the American colonies) in which he carefully defines 'Black-Moors', 'Mulatto's', 'Mestiso's', 'Indians', 'Criolios', and 'Simarrones', all of them being jointly categorized as 'Barbarians' (1677: front page, 122-124, 291-292).