metacarpus

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metacarpus

1. the skeleton of the hand between the wrist and the fingers, consisting of five long bones
2. the corresponding bones in other vertebrates

Metacarpus

 

the part of the superior (anterior) pentadactyl extremity of vertebrates that is located between the carpus and the distal phalanges of the fingers. In man, the metacarpus is made up of five metacarpal bones, which are attached to the muscles of the palm. The hypothenal muscles of the thumb and the little finger are the largest muscles of the palm. The tendons of the antebrachial muscles, which set the fingers in motion, pass along the metacarpal bones; blood vessels and motor and sensory nerves are also located here. On the palm side, the metacarpal skin is thick and hairless and the fold markings are individuated. On the dorsal side, the skin is thinner and often covered with short hairs. Tendovaginitis develops with inflammatory diseases of the sheaths of the tendons. Fractures of the metacarpal bones require apposition and immobilization for a period up to 1—1½ months.

metacarpus

[¦med·ə′kär·pəs]
(anatomy)
The portion of a hand or forefoot between the carpus and the phalanges.
References in periodicals archive ?
At your dog's age it is very likely it will be fine without surgery if just one of the metacarpals is broken.
2 Patients with multiple metacarpal fractures developed finger stiffness and one case had fractures in all the four metacarpals and the other had fracture involving two metacarpals.
The mean patient age for the metacarpal, finger phalanx, ulna, and clavicle fractures was less than 30 years and these could be considered as juvenile fractures.
Three common palmar digital arteries arise from the convexity of the SPA, each joined by a corresponding palmar metacarpal artery from the deep palmar arch and divide into two proper palmar digital arteries which supply the medial four fingers.
Subjects and Methods: Total 56 patients of 20-60 years age of both genders with comminuted and open fractures of metacarpal or phalanges bone of the hand, Swanson's Type-I were included by non-probability, consecutive sampling.
This case has the classic findings of Albright's facies with short fourth metacarpals and metatarsals, normal serum calcium, phosphate and PTH levels diagnostic of pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism with an added unusual feature of hypogonadism.
The mechanism of injury is an axial load on the partially flexed thumb metacarpal leading to an intra-articular avulsion fracture of the volar ulnar metacarpal base from the remaining thumb metacarpal.
The six cases presented here show remarkable similarities with each other and were concordant with symbrachydactyly type III or monodactylous type;5 the hallmark of this type is the absence of all fingers other than the thumb, including parts of the metacarpals.
Background: Phalangeal and metacarpal fractures are the most common skeletal injuries.
Fourth and fifth metacarpal shaft fractures are one of the most common hand injuries encountered in clinical practice.
The mean and standard deviations of breadth of metacarpals were as follow: 1st = 1.
Similarly the mean values of the 3rd 4th and 5th metacarpals fall within the ranges mentioned by Roberts (1997) and Bates and Harrison (1997).