Metalloids


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Metalloids

 

(1) Obsolete name for nonmetallic elements.

(2) General term for the elements B, Si, Ge, As, Sb, Te, and Po, which are intermediate in properties between metals and nonmetals; occasionally used in foreign and translated literature.

References in periodicals archive ?
Key WORDS: arsenic, bioaccessibility, bioavailability, gastrointestinal, human health, human health risk assessment, metalloid, soil physicochemical properties, speciation.
KEY WORDS: arsenic species, bacteria, colon, gastrointestinal, metalloid, microflora, presystemic metabolism, Simulator of the Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem, speciation.
In stark contrast to selenium, exposure to the metalloid arsenic has been strongly linked to the development of cancer of the bladder, liver, lung, kidney, and skin, with skin as the primary target (Kitchin 2001).
Bortey-Sam and coauthors (2015) assessed the health risk associated with HMs and metalloids in borehole drinking water in Tarkwa, Ghana.
Since herbal teas are often produced in countries where both soil and air are increasingly contaminated, these products may be tainted with metallic and metalloid elements.
The contaminants include metals and metalloids such as arsenic, zinc, antimony, cadmium, manganese and lead.
Heavy metals and metalloids, such as Cd, Pb, Hg, As, Se, etc.
Asians overall tended to have higher levels of several metals and metalloids in their blood and urine than white, black, or Hispanic populations.
In the class of combustibles which I call metalloids, I use only the initial
Therefore, the fate of heavy metals, metalloids and pesticides in the soils of Bangladesh is not known.
They highlight the material's adsorption, transformation into low toxic forms, or degradation phenomena, and the adsorption and separation of hazardous dyes, organic pollutants, heavy metals, and metalloids from aqueous solutions.