metaphysis

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Related to Metaphyses: epiphyses

metaphysis

[mə′ta·fə·səs]
(anatomy)
References in periodicals archive ?
It is noteworthy, however, that only the epiphyses and metaphyses were affected, as it is unlikely that a species this small could effectively attack bones this size in any other manner.
Repeat imaging obtained after 1 month of asfotase alfa, when the patient was 8 months old, revealed only slight cupping of the metaphyses of the tibia and radius and ulna (Figure 1).
A series of plain film radiographs demonstrated calvarial fracture lines at left temporoparietal region, bony anomaly of the spine, multiple old fractures with callus formation involving posterior aspect of left 10th, 11th ribs, right proximal humerus, bilateral proximal femurs, and metaphyses of tibias (Figure 2).
It frequently affects the metaphyses of the long bones in the lower extremities.
Hereditary multiple exostosis is a disorder in which an osseous projection capped by cartilage develops on the metaphyses of long bones [1]; the lesion is present in the femoral proximal metaphysis in 25% of patients [2].
Osteopathia striata is another rare bone dysplasia, characterized by long hyperdense striations mainly in the metaphyses of long bones and pelvis.
The most pronounced remodeling can be seen in metaphyses where lead accumulates predominantly.
The uncalcified soft tissues of metaphyses and epiphyses become distorted under pressure of weight bearing which also causes medial or lateral deviation of shafts of long bones (Radostits et al., 2000).
The most common radiological signs are disseminated sclerosis at the skull, vertebrae, pelvis, or appendicular bones, "bone-in-bone" sign at the vertebra and phalanx, bone modeling defects at the metaphyses of long bones, for example a funnel-like appearance (Erlenmeyer flask deformity), and sandwich vertebra sign.
Radiographs of these two affected individuals showed skeletal changes involving the spine, metaphyses and epiphyses of tubular bones descriptively termed SEMD (Figs 3 - 7).
The UBCs have a predilection for the metaphyses of long tubular bones, with 75% of lesions seen in the humerus and femur.
Pathophysiologically, this condition consists of multiple enostoses, or bone islands, which are scattered throughout the skeleton--especially in the epiphyses and metaphyses of long tubular bones.