Metaphysical Painting

Metaphysical Painting

 

a tendency in Italian painting that was prevalent from around 1915 to the early 1920’s. Its exponents (the founder G. de Chirico, C. Carrà, F. de Pisis, M. Campigli, F. Casorati, G. Morandi), who were connected with the magazine Valori Plastici (1919–22), shared to a large extent the general tendencies of neoclassicism of the 1920’s. They sought to express the depressing emptiness and frightening coldness of a world estranged from man and to reveal a kind of secret, magical meaning in the arrangement of unrelated objects.

REFERENCES

Carra, C. Pittura metafisica. Florence [1919].
Apollonio, U. Pittura metafisica. Venice, 1950.
References in periodicals archive ?
Morandi was a Futurist for a short period, and then, together with Giorgio de Chirico and Carlo Carra, was associated with the metaphysical painting movement (pittura metafisica).
(26.) Wieland Schmied's assessment is characteristic: "[De Chirico] spent a short time in Italy, more or less as a foreigner, before leaving, this time for Paris, where he developed his own style in isolation outside the mainstream of modernism." (Wieland Schmied, "De Chirico, Metaphysical Painting and the International Avant-Garde: Twelve Theses," in Italian Art in the Twentieth Century, 1900-1988, ed.
Hassan Khan: Is there a place for metaphysical painting in today's culture?
In the 1920s, he was equally attentive to apparently irreconcilable isms: Cubism, Surrealism, Neue Sachlichkeit, the metaphysical painting of Giorgio de Chirico.
One recurrent reference is the metaphysical painting of Alberto Savinio and Giorgio de Chirico, referred to in four paintings on canvas: the densely colored Ara Ara Ara, Stream of Thoughts, and Mindfulness of Emotions, and the vivid Cosmic Joke.
Chirico's rejection of modernism, did not mean that he abandoned his metaphysical painting. On the contrary, he returned again and again to the mannequins, eternally puffing locomotives, factory chimneys, lonely statues and silent empty spaces that had marked his early, revolution-ary paintings.
That he was influenced early on by the "metaphysical painting" of Giorgio de Chirico and Carlo Carra has always been evident, and is strikingly attested to here by a 1918 still life from the Pinacoteca di Brera in Milan, showing a mannequin head, among other objects.
Despite his apparently detached stance, the artist acts in maieutic fashion, "drawing out" rebellion against the system through play; just as in Metaphysical Painting or Surrealism, when the object becomes paradoxical, one finally sees it for what it is.
There turns out to be no dramatic moment of conversion in Gottlieb's career, no definitive point where he leaves behind metaphysical painting and arrives at Abstract Expressionism.
Margit Rowell, the curator of "Objects of Desire," which includes about 130 examples, ranging from the late nineteenth century to the present, divided the work on view into serviceable if not always illuminating categories: "The World as Perceptual Field," "Anatomies of Structure," "Real Fictions," "Metaphysical Painting," "Forms of New Objectivity," and so on.
He installed several sculptures in the city, all of which were dedicated to Giorgio de Chirico, whose metaphysical paintings in some cases depict the piazzas of Turin.
Giorgio de Chirico painted many of his most famous 'metaphysical paintings' in Paris in 1914.