Metcalfe's law


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Related to Metcalfe's law: Reed's law

Metcalfe's law

"The value of a network increases exponentially with the number of nodes," coined by Bob Metcalfe, founder of 3Com Corporation and major designer of Ethernet. A network becomes more useful as more users are connected. A primary example is the Internet. It fostered global email, which became more valuable as more users adopted it. See laws.
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Timothy Peterson, a founder and portfolio manager of Cane Island Alternative Advisors, a company managing global macro-investment strategy, also defined Metcalfe's Law as a model for bitcoin's value in his recent paper posted on the Social Science Research Network (SSRN).
(3.) Metcalfe's Law states that the value of a telecommunications network is proportional to the square of the number of connected users of the system.
Well, one thing is Metcalfe's law, which the folk at Cisco just love to quote.
Metcalfe's law states that the value of a telecommunications network is proportional to the square of the number of users of the system when they are connected with compatible, communicating devices.
(3.) Metcalfe's law. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metcalfe's_law.
(2005) Metcalfe's Law, a law related to the concept of network externalities, is an important factor to explain the success or failure of a certain betting exchange.