Metcalfe's law


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Related to Metcalfe's law: Reed's law

Metcalfe's law

"The value of a network increases exponentially with the number of nodes," coined by Bob Metcalfe, founder of 3Com Corporation and major designer of Ethernet. A network becomes more useful as more users are connected. A primary example is the Internet. It fostered global email, which became more valuable as more users adopted it. See laws.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This paper demonstrates that bitcoin's medium- to long-term price follows Metcalfe's Law.
Metcalfe's Law states that the value of a telecommunications network is proportional to the square of the number of connected users of the system.
If we enable such a foundation of underlying data sets, Metcalfe's law will then apply.
However, Metcalfe's Law can also be applied the other way.
Metcalfe's Law asserts that a network value grows proportionally to the number of users squared.
Metcalfe's Law Is Wrong; Bob Briscoe, Andrew Odlyzko and Benjamin Tilly; IEEE Spectrum, July 2006, pp.
Metcalfe's law applies nicely to list management software.
The explosive growth of the Internet is explained by Metcalfe's Law and by the possible number of logical network interconnections, which grows with the number, N, of Internet nodes, as Nx(N-1)/2.
This model is based on Metcalfe's law, which says the value of a network is proportional to the square of the number of users on the network.