iron meteorite

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Related to Meteoric iron: Octahedrite, Widmanstatten Pattern

iron meteorite

(iron) One of the main classifications of meteorites, containing nickel-iron alloys with small amounts of accessory minerals. The composition averages 90% iron, 10% nickel. The three main subdivisions are octahedrites, which have more than 6% nickel, the less common hexahedrites, with less than 6% nickel, and the nickel-rich ataxites. See also Widmanstätten figures.

iron meteorite

[′ī·ərn ′mēd·ē·ə‚rīt]
(astronomy)
A type of meteorite that consists mainly of iron and nickel and is several times heavier than any ordinary rock.
References in periodicals archive ?
By scanning the beads with beam of neutrons and gamma-rays, the team were able to reveal the unique texture and also high concentration of nickel, cobalt, phosphorous and germanium - which is only found in trace amounts in iron derived from ore - that is characteristics of meteoric iron, without having to attempt invasive analysis which could potentially damage these rare objects.
'A New Meteoric Iron from Piedade do Bagre, Minas Geraes Brazil,' The Mineralogical Magazine and Journal of the Mineralogical Society, vol.
It is also worth noting that, as was the case with so many of the early scientists who visited the meteorite, covetousness--that insidious and widespread sin prohibited so firmly and in such detail in the Ten Commandments--was also lurking in Spencer's mind, for in a popular 1930 article describing the 'Meteoric Irons from South-West Africa' he confesses to his readers that on his visit to the meteorite the previous September "I much regretted that I was quite unable to collect it for the British Museum." (Spencer, 1930b, p.
Compared to gold, silver, and copper, iron is an ugly metal, but the meteoric iron that was found revealed itself to be harder and tougher even than bronze.
(Meteoric iron is not pure iron but is a 9-to-1 mixture of iron and nickel, something the ancients couldn't duplicate since they knew nothing of nickel.) By 1200 B.C., undoubtedly through hit-and-miss, it had been discovered that iron, properly smelted, could appear in hard form.