meteoroid

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meteoroid:

see meteormeteor,
appearance of a small particle flying through space that interacts with the earth's upper atmosphere. While still outside the atmosphere, the particle is known as a meteoroid. Countless meteoroids of varying sizes are moving about the solar system at any time.
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meteoroid

(mee -tee-ŏ-roid) The collective term applied to meteoritic material in the Solar System, usually replaced by the terms micrometeorite for particles with mass less than 10–6 gram and meteorite for bodies with mass greater than about 105 grams. The majority of the mass of the meteoroid cloud around the Sun is made up of particles with individual masses between 10–7 and 10–3 gram. Meteoroids are usually produced by the decay of short-period comets and the collisional fragmentation of asteroids. In the main they move around the Sun in low-inclination direct orbits. The space density of meteoroids maximizes near the orbit of Mars and then falls off as 1/r 1.5, where r is the distance from the Sun. Individual meteoroids in the mass range 10–6 to 104 grams are fragile crumbly rocky dust particles with a composition similar to carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. See also meteor.

Meteoroid

 

a relatively small solid body that moves in outer space. The aggregate of meteoroids revolving around the sun forms the meteoric material in interplanetary space. Meteoroids are cometary debris or fragments of asteroids and in their motion occasionally encounter the earth and other planets.

meteoroid

[′med·ē·ə‚rȯid]
(astronomy)
Any solid object moving in interplanetary space that is smaller than a planet or asteroid but larger than a molecule.

meteoroid

any of the small celestial bodies that are thought to orbit the sun, possibly as the remains of comets. When they enter the earth's atmosphere, they become visible as meteors
References in periodicals archive ?
"But when the Moon passed through one of these meteoroid streams, enough vapour was ejected for us to detect it.
To release water, the meteoroids had to penetrate at least 3 inches (8 centimeters) below the surface.
A meteor or "shooting star" is produced when an interplanetary dust particle (meteoroid) enters the Earth's atmosphere and deflagrates, leaving a train of excited and ionized particles along its path.
Astronomer Bill Cooke from NASA's Meteoroid Environments Office in Huntsville said in a statement that this year, forecasters have predicted a Perseid outburst with double the normal rates on the night of August 11-12.
Meteoroids come from comets, and comets -- and other celestial objects like them -- are about the closest we'll ever get to the big bang.
The lines in the 'upper' and 'lower' components have significant differences, possibly indicating fragmentation or some variation in the meteoroid characteristics (Figure 4).
Cloudless skies permitting, the best viewing time will be the hours just before dawn on Monday and Tuesday, the head of US space agency National Aeronautics and Space Administration's meteoroid office, Bill Cooke, told Agence France-Presse.
The short-lived trail of light the burning meteoroid produces is called a meteor.
Among specific topics are primordial massive supernovae as molecular factories at high redshifts, observational evidence for dust growth in proto-planetary discs, hydrous-carbonaceous meteoroids in the Hadean Aeon, dust in clusters of galaxies, probing dust with gamma-ray bursts, analogs of cosmic dust, intersteller ices, and interstellar dust models and evolutionary implications.
The books comprising this impressive series include: Earth; Moon; Jupiter; Mars; Mercury; Neptune; Pluto; Saturn; Sun; Uranus; Venus; Comets, Asteroids, and Meteoroids; Constellations; The Milky Way and Other Galaxies; Black Holes; Space Exploration; Space Walks, The International Space Station.
These amazing streaks of light you can sometimes see in the night sky are caused by tiny bits of dust and rock called meteoroids falling into the Ear th's atmosphere and burning up.
They also had to test meteoroids, help us survive, and communicate to the Mission Control.

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