Methyl Chloride


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Related to Methyl Chloride: methylene chloride

methyl chloride

[′meth·əl ′klȯr‚īd]
(organic chemistry)

Methyl Chloride

 

CH3C1; a colorless gas with a distinctive sweet odor. Boiling point, −24.1°C ; density relative to air, 1.785. It dissolves readily in organic solvents but is only slightly soluble in water. In volume concentrations of 8.2–19.7 percent, it reacts with air to form explosive mixtures. It exhibits properties characteristic of alkyl halides. It is prepared commercially by the chlorination of methane. Methyl chloride is widely used as a methylating agent in the manufacture of silicone rubber, dyes, and other products.

methyl chloride

A gas which liquefies under compression; used as a refrigerant.
References in periodicals archive ?
In our study, neem extracts obtained with solvents such as methyl chloride and hexane did not show the activity observed with fresh material, as no mortality was detected, and only methyl chloride extract from leaves reduced the weight of 4th instars in the laboratory strain.
"We only know where half of the methyl chloride and two-thirds of the methyl bromide are coming from.
"The outside color is very dark, almost a blackish tone." Dattala also says that water process coffees will "spot" more easily than methyl chloride processed coffees.
Methyl Chloride Headaches, nausea, blurred vision, agitation, aggresiveness.
Chlorine levels in the stack from the energy recovery unit exceeded the 10 milligrams per cubic metre limit; lA split in the plastic liner of a pipe caused a leak of hydrochloric acid; lThe site breached its threehour methyl chloride limit; lA split in a plastic lined component of a pressure gauge led to a leak of hydrochloric acid which liberated a small amount of acid fumes.
They found that each gram of fungi churned out methyl halides--which include methyl chloride, methyl bromide, and methyl iodide--at a daily yield of a few millionths of a gram.
Mined quartz, or silica, (SiO2) is reduced to silicon metal in an electric arc furnace, then converted to chlorosilanes through a direct process reaction with methyl chloride. The resulting polymer chain can be manipulated in a number of ways to affect physical properties and processing characteristics.
Which process is the most "natural" may become a point of contention in future marketing campaigns, and all the "natural" processes will be fighting against each other instead of the common enemy (methyl chloride).
We investigate three prime candidates for biosignature gases: Methyl chloride, Dimethylsulfide and ammonia.