estragole

(redirected from Methyl chavicol)

estragole

[′es·trə‚gōl]
(organic chemistry)
C6H4(C3H5)(OCH3) A colorless liquid with the odor of anise, found in basil oil, estragon oil, and anise bark oil; used in perfumes and flavorings.
References in periodicals archive ?
The main constituents are a volatile oil which contains anithole, methyl chavicol, and saffrole.
The estragole is also termed as Methyl Chavicol and is chemically named as 1-methoxy-4-prop-2-enylbenzene.
The essential oils were acquired and the composition of the products were informed by the producer company through technical reports (clove Eugenia caryophyllata: eugenol = 86%; tea tree Melaleuca alternifolia: terpinen-4-ol = 42% and gamma-Terpinene = 22%; basil Ocimum basilicum: methyl chavicol = 84%).
Linalool, geraniol, geranial, methyl chavicol and eugenol were active components against A.
In the present work we have investigated the effect of sub-inhibitory concentrations of previously used OSEO (methyl chavicol as lead component, Khan et al., 2010b,c) on virulence attributes of C.
The European type of basil contains mostly linalool and methyl chavicol [12, 13].
basilicum and its major constituent, methyl chavicol are more effective as compared to O.
methyl chavicol, [alpha]-calacorene and [alpha]-corocalene (low amount) from C.
A comparison of the constituents of the essential oil of Coleus aromaticus of this region from other different regions (13,18-27) showed that the carvacrol was found as a major compound with three new chemotypes viz., methyl chavicol, [alpha]-calacorene and [alpha]-corocalene in less quantity.
* Ocimum basilicum CT Methyl Chavicol is grown in several places including Reunion, Comoro, and Egypt.
A source of almost pure methyl chavicol. Volatile oil from the aerial parts of Tagetes lucida (Asteraceae) cultivated in Costa Rica.